Archive for the ‘ Cops ’ Category

Some stupid person wants to kick their straight A daughter out of the house when she turns 18 while she is still in high school.

What a piece of _______ .

Listen up Shawn you foolish idiot.  That tiny little man that is running your life is going to drop you like a turd when his kids don’t need a nanny anymore.  Then who will you have?  You are burning this bridge.

Source: 2012 California Codes :: FAM – Family Code :: DIVISION 9 – SUPPORT [3500 – 5616] :: PART 2 – CHILD SUPPORT :: CHAPTER 1 – Duty of Parent to Support Child :: ARTICLE 1 – Support of Minor Child :: Section 3901

Chicago police were questioning four African-Americans Wednesday evening over a Facebook Live video that showed a mentally disabled white man being tied up and tortured while someone yelled F— white people! and F— Donald Trump!

Source: Four arrested after Facebook Live video shows man being tied up, beaten

A sheriff’s deputy in Kansas Tased 91-year-old man with Alzheimer’s disease in his back after he refused to go to the doctor, shocking newly-released body cam footage shows.

Source: Cops tase 91-year-old man with Alzheimer’s | Fox News

No, your pubic hair cannot prevent STDs.

Source: Myths about pubic hair you must stop believing t1216 | Photo Galleries of Weight Loss, Diet Plan, Healthy Recipes, Sexual Health | TheHealthSite.com

Letting the kids drink is a tough subject for parents: To give a tipple or not?

on this the 30th anniversary of the national drinking age being raised to 21, I’m asking myself the following question: Am I better off never letting my girls drink around me, at home or at family celebrations, until they reach the legal drinking age or does it make drinking less taboo and alluring if I let them start drinking at home, maybe with sips of wine and beer, during their teenage years?If you look at the scientific evidence, it seems more studies point to a negative consequence of parental offers of even a small amount of alcohol.
A recent report in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs (PDF) highlighted two such studies: One in 2011 in Sweden of 13-year-olds found that when children were offered alcohol by a parent, it was associated with a higher likelihood of heavy episodic drinking in girls, but not in boys; and a 1997 study of fourth- and sixth-graders in the United States found that when parents offered children a small amount of alcohol, the children were more likely to initiate alcohol use on their own.
Alcohol and teens

Alcohol and teens 01:08
In addition, another study compared seventh-graders in the United States with Australia, where adult-supervised drinking for teens is allowed. Some 36% of the Australian teens had problems with binge drinking compared with only 21% of American teens, according to the 2011 study.
“I think the evidence would suggest to me you are not playing your best hand if you provide alcohol to your kids,” said Dr. Ralph Hingson, director of the division of epidemiology and prevention research for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.
“It may be that nothing’s going to happen, but it’s like if you’re driving a car too fast in a residential neighborhood that the likelihood of being in a car crash is increased because you are taking an unnecessary risk.”
But at least one study shows that drinking with parents can lead to positive results.
The study, published in the 2004 Journal of Adolescent Heath and showcased in a 2008 Time magazine story, found that children who drank with their parents were about half as likely to say they had alcohol in the past month and about one third as likely to admit to binge drinking (having five or more drinks in a row) in the previous two weeks.
Stanton Peele is a psychologist, addiction expert and author of several books on addiction, including “Addiction Proof Your Child.”
The New York City father of three said he allowed his children, now in their 20s and 30s, to have a few sips of alcohol during meals in their teenage years and then, around 16, let them have a full glass of wine.
“The chances that children are going to go to college … and not consume alcohol are infinitesimal,” said Peele, who also provides online addiction treatment and support.
“And so the question every parent has to ask themselves (is) … ‘Who is going to teach them how to drink?’ “
Brian Gresko of Brooklyn, New York, a Babble.com contributor, says he and his wife are already teaching their young son about drinking.
In their house, alcohol is part of the family culture, said Gresko, who says he and his wife always have a cocktail, glass of wine or beer while cooking dinner and during the meal.
“We don’t hide this from our 5-year-old son. Felix knows the guys at our local wine store, and he sometimes asks me to make him ‘mocktails’ when we drink cocktails,” said Gresko, editor of a recent anthology of 22 novelists writing about fatherhood called “When I First Held You.”
“Alcohol is a part of life, and I would rather he begin to form a relationship with it under my supervision instead of in secret with his friends, where who knows what could happen.”
Elena Sonnino, a wellness writer, social media strategist and founder of the site Live.Do.Grow., also wants her 9-year-old to feel comfortable enough to talk with her about anything, but she takes a different approach.
She recently scaled back from having a nightly glass of wine to having one just once a week for wellness reasons and doesn’t believe she’ll let her daughter have sips of alcohol until she can legally have them.
“We won’t offer her tastes because we’re trying to show her that drinking wine is a responsibility,” said the northern Virginia mom. “You have a responsibility when you start drinking anything, wine or whatever it is, and you need to be able to make good decisions and until you’re 18, 21, your brain isn’t fully formed.”
Melissa Moog, a mom of three and founder of Itsabelly Baby Planners, a new parent and baby safety consulting service, also won’t be letting her kids enjoy sips of wine and beer.
“I think a legal drinking age was established for a very good reason,” said Moog of Portland, Oregon. “If I allowed my daughter at 16 to try a sip, I would be nervous that she’d think subconsciously that I was OK with her drinking before the legal age limit because I let her take a sip of my drink.”
While I admit I am still as confused as ever about what I will do when my girls get older, there are a few things I am pretty certain of that are backed by strong evidence.
I won’t ever get drunk in front of my kids, with studies showing that children who see their parents drunk are more likely to get drunk themselves.
And I will talk to my girls about alcohol as they get older. That’s the focus of the #TalkEarly online campaign by the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility, encouraging parents to have conversations early so as children get older, the topic of drinking is not taboo.
A big focus is also encouraging parents to watch what they say and do in social media, including making jokes about needing a glass of wine.
“Avoid transmitting the ‘I need a drink’ message after a long day or stressful situation, and talking about what it feels like to get drunk,” said Micky Morrison, a mom of two and founder of BabyWeight TV.
Michelle Staruiala, a mom of three in Saskatchewan, who said her kids rarely see her have a drink, is proof good communication can lead to positive results.
She has always talked with her kids about everything, she said, and recently asked her 16-year-old son why he sometimes doesn’t go out with his friends.
“He’s like ‘Mom, some of them are drinking. … I don’t feel comfortable being around those situations.’
Join the conversation

See the latest news and share your comments with CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter.

“He’s really, really listened to our talks and he, to this day, never has had a drink in his life. So being 16, nowadays that’s kind of a rare thing,” she added with a laugh.

Source: Is drinking with your kids at home a good idea? – CNN.com

February 13, 2013

Shocking Alien Fears Force Pope From Office

By: Sorcha Faal, and as reported to her Western Subscribers

 

A stunning Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) report prepared for President Putin, which is circulating in the Kremlin today, states that Pope Benedict XVI was forced to resign this past week over Catholic Church fears that this 85-year-old leader of over 1 billion Christians was “mentally and physically unprepared” to deal with the coming revelation about the truth of alien beings.

In our 22 January report, Russia Orders Obama: Tell World About Aliens, Or We Will, we detailed how the issue of extraterrestrial beings was brought to the forefront of the World Economic Forum (WEF) with the naming in their 2013 Executive Summary of the danger posed to our world over the discovery of alien life with their stating: “Proof of life elsewhere in the universe could have profound psychological implications for human belief systems.”

Also noted in our previous report were Prime Minister Medvedev’s 7 December 2012 off-air comments to reporters which were recorded and wherein he stated: “Along with the briefcase with nuclear codes, the president of the country is given a special ‘top secret’ folder. This folder in its entirety contains information about aliens who visited our planet… Along with this, you are given a report of the absolutely secret special service that exercises control over aliens on the territory of our country… More detailed information on this topic you can get from a well-known movie called Men In Black… I will not tell you how many of them are among us because it may cause panic.”

Spurring Pope Benedict XVI to become the first leader of the Catholic Church to resign in nearly 600 years, this MFA report says, was the appearance over Los Cristianos, Spain on 21 August 2011 of the long prophesized “bird of prey” interplanetary spacecraft, and which was followed nearly 3 weeks ago with a fleet of them appearing in the skies over Mexico City.

To fully understand the significance of these “bird of prey” UFO’s, this report continues, files relating to the 27 September 1989 Voronezh Incident must be studied in length, especially as it relates to the “messages” delivered to eyewitnesses from the “giants”.

In an 11 October 1989 New York Times article about the Voronezh Incident titled U.F.O. Landing Is Fact, Not Fantasy, the Russians Insist it says:

“It is not a joke, nor a hoax, nor a sign of mental instability, nor an attempt to drum up local tourism by drawing the curious, the Soviet press agency Tass insisted today in discussions of what it called an extraterrestrial visit to southern Russia.

Residents of the city of Voronezh insisted today that lanky, three-eyed extraterrestrial creatures had indeed landed in a local park and gone for a stroll and that a seemingly fantastic report about the event carried Monday by the official press agency Tass was absolutely true.

The three-eyed creature, about nine feet tall and fashionably dressed in silvery overalls and bronze boots and with a disk on its chest, disappeared, then landed and came out for a promenade with a companion and a robot.

The aliens seemed to communicate with each other, producing the mysterious appearance of a shining triangle, and activated the robot with a touch.”

Regarding these “messages” from the Voronezh “giants”, this MFA report says, was the warning to human beings that when these “bird of prey” UFO’s descend upon Earth the whole planet will be in peril.

The Voronezh “giants” further related, this report says, that the alien beings associated with these “bird of prey” UFO’s were the cause of the 14 April 1561 massive “sky battle” over Nuremberg, Germany which was depicted in a famous 16th century woodcut by Hans Glaser [photo 3rd left] and described by the residents as: “A very frightful spectacle.” “The sky appeared to fill with cylindrical objects from which red, black, orange and blue white disks and globes emerged. Crosses and tubes resembling cannon barrels also appeared whereupon the objects promptly began to fight one another.”

Important to note is that the Catholic Christian faith headed by Pope Benedict XVI, as well as nearly every other religion on Earth, all prophesize in their teachings a time when the “gods” will return to our planet and engage in a battle that could very well bring our entire planet to the brink of destruction.

Equally important to note about Pope Benedict XVI’s shock resignation is how it eerily compares with Saint Malachy, who as an Irish saint and Archbishop of Armagh, in the 12th Century, received a vision of 112 Popes later attributed to the apocalyptic list of Prophecy of the Popes. He was the first Irish saint to be canonized by Pope Clement III in 1199.

American authors Tom Horn and Cris Putnam in their 2012 book “Petrus Romanus: The Final Pope is Here” about Saint Malachy’s prophecies told interviewers last Spring that Pope Benedict XVI would resign by late 2012, or early 2013, and described the next Pope to follow as “Petrus Romanus,” or “Peter the Roman,” writing: “In the final persecution of the Holy Roman Church there will reign Peter the Roman, who will feed his flock among many tribulations; after which the seven-hilled city will be destroyed and the dreadful Judge will judge the people.”

Though the masses of people reading of the things this report contains will, undoubtedly, ridicule them, the same cannot be said of the elite moneyed classes who, even at this writing, are protecting themselves from “something” at such a fever-pitched pace it is destabilizing the entire global economy, and as exampled by the highly respected Zero Hedge news service in their article titled “What Do They Know That We Don’t?” and which, in part, says:

“Friday evening when no one was supposed to pay attention, Google announced that Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt would sell 3.2 million of his Google shares in 2013, 42% of the 7.6 million shares he owned at the end of last year—after having already sold 1.8 million shares in 2012. But why would he sell 5 million shares, about 53% of his holdings, with Google stock trading near its all-time high?

“Part of his long-term strategy for individual asset diversification and liquidity,” Google mollified us, according to the Wall Street Journal. Soothing words. Nothing but “a routine diversification of assets.”

Routine? He didn’t sell any in 2008 as the market was crashing. He didn’t sell at the bottom in early 2009. And he didn’t sell during the rest of 2009 as Google shares were soaring, nor in 2010, as they continued to soar. In 2011, he eased out of about 300,000 shares, a mere rounding error in his holdings. But in 2012, he opened the valves, and in 2013, he’d open the floodgates. So it’s not “routine.”

Mr. Schmidt isn’t alone. Corporate insiders were “aggressively selling their shares,” reported Mark Hulbert. And they were doing so “at an alarming pace.” The buy sell-to-buy ratio had risen to 9.2-to-1; insiders had sold over 9 times as many shares as they’d bought. They’d been aggressive sellers for weeks.

Instantly, soothing voices were heard: “don’t be alarmed,” they said. But Mr. Schmidt and his colleagues at the top of corporate America, multi-billionaires many of them, are immensely well connected, not only to each other but also to the Fed, whose twelve regional Federal Reserve Banks they own and control.”

To why Google Chairman Schmidt did not attend this years World Economic Forum, where the danger of aliens was being discussed, opting instead for a visit to North Korea (who announced yesterday that they had exploded another nuclear weapon) and when coupled with the information contained in this MFA report, is far from being “soothing”, and is, instead, something well all should be very alarmed about as the end is much nearer than the beginning as those with “eyes to see” and “ears to hear” already know.

February 13, 2012 © EU and US all rights reserved. Permission to use this report in its entirety is granted under the condition it is linked back to its original source at WhatDoesItMean.Com. Freebase content licensed under CC-BY and GFDL.

[Ed. Note: Western governments and their intelligence services actively campaign against the information found in these reports so as not to alarm their citizens about the many catastrophic Earth changes and events to come, a stance that the Sisters of Sorcha Faal strongly disagrees with in believing that it is every human beings right to know the truth. Due to our missions conflicts with that of those governments, the responses of their ‘agents’ against us has been a longstanding misinformation/misdirection campaign designed to discredit and which is addressed in the report “Who Is Sorcha Faal?”.]

You May Already Be To Late…But It Has Begun!

They Are Going To Come For You…Why Are You Helping Them?

Source: Shocking Alien Fears Force Pope From Office

Two officers were killed and a third was injured responding to a reported disturbance at a residence in Palm Springs a city in the desert in California.

Police said Felix fired through a closed door without provocation as Palm Springs officers attempted to resolve a domestic disturbance call Saturday.

Two officers — one a new mother, the other close to retirement — were killed. A third officer was injured but expected to recover.

Felix is eligible for the death penalty, and prosecutors will make a decision in the next few weeks, District Attorney Mike Hestrin said at a news conference Sunday.

“I will tell you that I consider a brutal murder of a police officer to be a very heinous crime,” Hestrin said. “So I’ll leave it at that.”

Twelve hours after the shooting, Felix surrendered to a SWAT team from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department.

The suspect reportedly had told his father moments before the shooting that he wanted to kill police officers.

Authorities said Sunday they would not address any of Felix’s criminal history and confirmed only a few details of the shooting, citing an active investigation.

Felix was wearing “soft, concealable body armor” and had several high-capacity gun magazines when he was captured early Sunday morning, Chief Deputy Ray Wood said at the press conference. He was not armed with a weapon when he was taken into custody, Wood said.

Wood said sheriff’s deputies “used a number of tools at our disposal” to try to draw Felix out during the standoff, including searching the house with a remote-controlled robot and then deploying tear gas.

“We attempted for several hours. There were many, many attempts to establish communication with him,” Wood said. “There was no mistaking that we were present.”

The officers killed were Lesley Zerebny, 27, and Jose Gilbert “Gil” Vega, 63.

Zerebny had recently returned from maternity leave and was the mother of a 4-month-old. She was married to a Riverside County sheriff’s deputy. A SWAT team from her husband’s department participated in efforts to capture the suspect and ultimately did so after an exchange of gunfire early Sunday morning, according to a statement from the sheriff’s department.

Vega, a 35-year veteran, was scheduled to retire in December. He had chosen to work overtime Saturday.

They were the first Palm Springs police officers to die in the line of duty since 1962, according to the Palm Springs Desert News.

“Today Palm Springs lost two brave officers,” Reyes said. “They go out every day with their boots on the ground. They gave their all for you.

” . . . I am awake in a nightmare right now. … If ever there was a time to pray for the Palm Springs police department, it is now.”

The third officer who was injured was expected to be released from the hospital Sunday, police said.

Reyes choked back tears throughout a a news conference Saturday as he recounted the domestic disturbance call his officers had tried to resolve.

The officers were called to the home just after an occupant had rushed across the street in a panic, telling a neighbor that his son had a gun and wanted to shoot police. “He came over and asked for help,” neighbor Frances Serrano told reporters.

“He said: ‘Help. I need help. My son is in the house and he’s crazy. He has a gun. He’s ready to shoot all the police.’”

The man walked back to his house and shortly afterward, Serrano said, she heard repeated gunshots “starting with a loud, I mean really loud, bang.”

As officers were attempting to talk to the man behind the door, he “threatened to shoot the officers” through it, Reyes said. Then the man opened fire, gunning down the officers.

Dozens of officers from surrounding jurisdictions responded to an emergency call about 10 minutes after the first one, surrounding the house and sealing off a four-block perimeter, uncertain as to the whereabouts of the shooter and warning residents to stay inside.

“There were police everywhere,” Serrano told reporters. “I looked out the window and saw police with rifles.”

Juan Graciano, 67, who lives a block away, told the Los Angeles Times he saw police attempting to revive Zerebny. “I saw a woman officer who had been laid down in the trunk of a police cruiser. I watched as they picked her up and laid her down on the street and began administering CPR.”

Another neighbor told reporters of hearing more rounds of gunfire that continued for up to 20 minutes. “We stayed indoors,” Georgie Eden told the Times. “It was kind of, pretty scary.”

The Palm Springs Desert Sun described the suspect as a “known gang member,” who spent four years in prison for a 2009 attempted murder plot. He was also arrested in 2013, the paper said, after fighting with police at the same home where Saturday’s shooting took place.

Authorities on Sunday did not address the suspect’s criminal history or detail the type of weapon or weapons used.

“At this point of time it is very premature for us to be talking about the all the details of the investigation,” said Wood said. “Right now it is still way early. We are still in the front end of the investigation.”

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department is investigating the shooting.

The Palm Springs incident also comes on the heels of other high-profile police officer deaths. Last week, a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s sergeant was shot and killed while responding to a burglary call in Lancaster, Calif. In July, five police officers in Dallas were killed and seven others were wounded by a lone gunman.

According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, 67 law enforcement officers have died in the line of duty this year as of July 20, an increase over the 62 officers killed in the same period last year. The nonprofit group’s mid-year report noted a troubling increase in some of those deaths occurring in “ambush” attacks.

This post has been updated.

Read more:

Two officers — one a new mother, another close to retiring — dead after Palm Springs shooting

‘Unprovoked, violent, intentional act’: Video shows car plowing into Phoenix police officers

Mother of three survives car crash — only to be gunned down by the other driver, police say

Source: Man who killed two Palm Springs officers had body armor and gun magazines, officials say – The Washington Post

Yahoo Inc last year secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customers’ incoming emails for specific information provided by U.S. intelligence officials, according to people familiar with the matter.

Source: Exclusive: Yahoo secretly scanned customer emails for U.S. intelligence – sources

Drug deaths over the past 15 years have been rising so rapidly that experts say they’ve rarely, if ever, seen anything like it.

This is America on drugs: A visual guide

Updated 11:28 AM ET, Fri September 23, 2016

In modern history, few things have caused such a sharp spike in US deaths as drug overdoses.

CNN reached out to every state for the latest statistics on drug deaths, with half providing data from 2015. It found that drugs deaths continue to rise rapidly in many states.

FATAL ADDICTIONS

Epidemiologists in several states blame the increasing number of drug-related deaths on greater use of heroin and synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl.
“If you look at the cause of death, we just don’t normally see increases like this,” said Robert Anderson, the chief of the mortality statistics branch at the National Center for Health Care Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TOP CAUSE OF ACCIDENTAL DEATHS

Drugs are the leading cause of accidental death in this country. Fatal overdoses surpassed shooting deaths and fatal traffic accidents years ago.
For perspective on how fast drug deaths have risen, Anderson said, consider the sharp rise in heart disease in the early half of the 20th century. It took about 50 years for the rate of heart disease to double. It took drug deaths a fraction of that time.
The only thing comparable might be the HIV epidemic when it first reached the United States in the late 1980s, when there were no drugs to treat it. But unlike with HIV, where demonstrators took to the streets to demand help, the drug epidemic often happened out of the spotlight.
That might be because drug deaths have disproportionately hit small towns and rural America, mainly in Appalachia and in the Southwest, far away from the eye of the national media. It became a particularly dangerous problem for middle-age white men and women.

HEROIN’S DEADLY EFFECT

Heroin-related deaths increased 439% from 1999 to 2014. As of 2014, heroin-related deaths had more than tripled in five years and quintupled in 10 years.
In 2014, opioids were involved in 28,647 deaths — 61% of all US drug overdose deaths — and 10,574 were related to heroin, in particular. Data from 2014 reflects “two distinct but interrelated trends,” the CDC notes, a longterm increase in overdose deaths due to prescription opioids and a surge in illicit opioid overdose deaths, mostly related to heroin.

NATIONWIDE EPIDEMIC

In 2010, West Virginia moved into the top spot on the list of states with the highest number of drug deaths. From 2014 to 2015 alone, the number of deaths in that state increased by 12%. New Hampshire saw a 24% increase in deaths in that same time period.
How to get help

Struggling with addiction or know someone who is? Here are several organizations that help addicts beat back their habits and regain their lives.

The state that has struggled the longest is New Mexico. Its Rio Arriba County has the highest number of drug deaths for a single county in the United States, according to data analysis of more than 15 years of records from the CDC and state departments of health. Looking at drug death data from 1999 to 2014, New Mexico most often holds the No. 1 spot for the highest number of deaths.
The sharp uptick in deaths seems to coincide with Americans’ increasing use of drugs like illicit fentanyl.
Pop star Prince died of a fentanyl overdose in April. The pain reliever is often given to cancer patients and is more than 100 times as strong as morphine and 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin.

STATE HIT THE HARDEST

Appalachia has struggled with a number of high-profile overdose cases recently.
West Virginia is home to six of the top 20 counties in the country with the largest concentrations of drug-related deaths. Kentucky has the most, with nine counties on that list. Ohio has also been hard-hit by the epidemic.

Source: This is America on drugs: A visual guide – CNN.com

Now that Walmart and your dumbass has sent all our money to China.  Chinese and Russian naval forces began joint exercises in the South China Sea on Monday, adding a new twist to ongoing tensions over Chinese island-building in the region.

The eight-day exercises will highlight marine corps units in “live-fire drills, sea crossing and island landing operations, and island defense and offense exercises,” Chinese navy spokesperson Liang Yang said in a report from China’s official Xinhua News Agency.
Aside from the marines, Chinese and Russian surface ships, submarines, planes, helicopters and amphibious armored equipment would be used, Liang said.

The Russian destroyer Admiral Tributs arrives for exercises with the Chinese navy.

Russia has sent some of its best vessels, including the Ropucha-class landing ship, and the Udaloy-class destroyer” to participate in the exercises, according to Chinese state-run broadcaster CCTV.
The 7,500-ton Udaloy-class destroyers are designed for anti-submarine warfare, while the 4,000-ton Ropucha-class landing ships are designed to carry up to 24 armored vehicles directly onto beaches.

Contested waters

The China-Russia naval exercises are an annual event, with previous versions taking place in the Sea of Japan, the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea, among other locations.
But this year’s event in the South China Sea takes on new significance after a landmark ruling against China’s claims in the region.
The Permanent Court of Arbitration found China had unlawfully restricted fishing access around the Scarborough Shoal, a small but strategic reef and fertile fishing ground 130 miles (200 kilometers) west from the Philippine island of Luzon.
Then last week the Philippines military released images of Chinese ships it said were capable of dredging sand around the reef.
Beijing has denied it is reclaiming land, saying that while Chinese coast guard vessels patrol the waters around the shoal, which it calls Huangyandao, they were there for “law enforcement.”

Russian and Chinese officers greet each other at the beginning of eight days of military exercises.

Territorial hotspots

Scarborough Shoal is only one point of tension in the South China Sea.
China claims almost all of the sea, including islands more than 800 miles (1,200 kilometers) from the Chinese mainland, despite objections from neighbors including the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei and Vietnam.
Tensions have ratcheted up in the past two years as China has reclaimed land in massive dredging operations in the Spratly Islands, turning sandbars into islands equipped with airfields, ports and lighthouses.
In recent months, Beijing has reacted angrily to US freedom of navigation operations in the region, scrambling fighter jets and boats and denouncing the nation’s navies as “threatening Chinese sovereignty.”
When China announced the current naval exercises in July, it said it “does not target any third party,” according to the Xinhua report.

A group of six Gulf Arab countries expressed “deep concern” Monday over a bill passed by the U.S. Congress that would allow families of Sept. 11 victims to sue the government of Saudi Arabia over the attacks.  Israel was not included as one of the states that could be sued.

The head of the Saudi-dominated Gulf Cooperation Council, Abdullatif al-Zayani, said in a statement that the legislation runs against the principles of international law and sets a dangerous precedent for foreign relations.

The U.S. House of Representatives approved the legislation last Friday, following earlier passage by the Senate. The White House has signaled President Barack Obama would veto the proposed law over concerns that it could open the U.S. up to similar lawsuits from other countries.

The legislation could also further strain relations between Washington and oil-rich Saudi Arabia, which is wary of the Obama administration’s outreach to its regional rival, Iran.

Fifteen of the 19 hijackers on the planes that killed nearly 3,000 people in New York, the Washington, D.C. area and Pennsylvania were Saudi nationals.

Congress in July released 28 declassified pages from a congressional report into 9/11 that rekindled speculation that some of the hijackers had ties to Saudi government officials a goverment that worked very close with the Bush Family for many years in the oil business. Later Kangaroo court U.S. investigations into the attacks were unable to substantiate the allegations.

Saudi Arabia welcomed the release of the declassified files, saying they contained no surprises and should end speculation of official Saudi involvement. But the kingdom has strongly objected to the proposed legislation allowing 9/11 lawsuits, which would give victims’ families the right to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts over any role that the Saudi government may have played in the 2001 attacks.

The United Arab Emirates, which has the second-largest economy in the GCC after Saudi Arabia, issued its own statement echoing the Gulf bloc’s concerns Monday.

“This law is not equal with the foundations and principles of relations among states, and represents a clear violation given its negative repercussions and dangerous precedents,” said Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the federation’s foreign minister.

The seven-state Emirates federation is one of Washington’s closest Arab allies. Two of the 9/11 hijackers were Emirati.

Besides Saudi Arabia and the UAE, the GCC includes Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman and Qatar.

In its own statement, Qatar said the 9/11 legislation “violates international law, particularly the principle of sovereign equality between states.” The head of the Arab League, Ahmed Aboul-Gheit, added his criticism too, saying the law would contradict “established norms of the international law,” according to Egypt’s state news agency MENA.

 

Source: Gulf States Hit Back at Sept. 11 Saudi Lawsuit Legislation – The New York Times

It was 23 years ago that Charl Van Wyk was sitting peacefully in the congregation at St. James Church in Cape Town, South Africa, when terror struck.

As Van Wyk has told WND, “The moment of chaos and carnage unfurled is forever etched in my mind.”

On July 25, 1993, while young people were singing in front of the congregation, Van Wyk heard a noise at a front door leading into the sanctuary. A group of attackers stepped through the doorway and lobbed grenades affixed with nails at the congregation. Then they opened fire with their assault rifles.

It took a few seconds to grasp what was happening, but when Van Wyk realized what danger the church was in, he dropped to his knees and drew his .38 special revolver from his ankle holster. Although he was in the fourth row from the back of the large sanctuary, he aimed as best he could and fired two rounds at the attackers.

He then crawled to the aisle and dashed for a back door, hoping to get behind the attackers and shoot them at close range to prevent further bloodshed.

But as he rounded the corner outside the building, he saw the terrorists already at their getaway car. He fired his last three rounds, and the terrorists jumped into their vehicle and raced off.

The attackers, who were members of the Azanian People’s Liberation Army, killed 11 people and wounded 58. They had also planned to lob petrol bombs into the sanctuary, where there were an estimated 1,000 people.

However, they abandoned that phase of the attack when they realized someone in the congregation was shooting back at them.

It may be a cliché, but Charl Van Wyk has proven it true – the only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun (and grenades and petrol bombs) is a good guy with a gun.

Van Wyk chronicled his harrowing ordeal, as well as the aftermath and implications, in the book and DVD versions of “Shooting Back: The Right and Duty of Self-Defense.”

Today, gun rights are under attack in America and around the world. Van Wyk, whose Christian mission work focuses on Africa, argues Christians have a duty to resist anti-gun laws and those who pass them.

“If a thug in government, or on the streets, wants to take my life or someone else’s, or rape my wife or daughter, he needs to dodge my bullets!” Van Wyk told WND. “In Africa we often see the rape of women and children by rebel and government soldiers. The Christian man does not only have a right, but also a duty, to resist these wicked men with lethal force.

“To protect our families is to honor God. Basically, God’s laws trump human laws!”

Can Christians use guns to defend themselves? Yes, they can — and they must. Get your copy of “Shooting Back: The Right and Duty of Self-Defense” from the WND Superstore today.

Van Wyk remarked more Christian men should pray, “Lord, make me fast and accurate!” instead of being “spineless cowards who make the working environment of the bad guy safer.”

He said historically Christians believed not only were murderers guilty of law breaking, but also those who did not protect the lives of victims of violence as best they could. He wonders where that doctrine would leave most of today’s Christian men.

“We are to help the suffering with our resources; how can we stand by and watch the murder of the innocent?” he asked rhetorically. “In the Christian life, cowardice is a crime!”

The hero said resisting the wicked is actually part of a Christian’s God-ordained witness to them.

“During the war between Northern and Southern Sudan, Northern Muslim soldiers defected to the Southern Christian army because of their fighting tenacity and the godly manner in which they treated their POWs,” Van Wyk revealed. “Have we ever considered that the way in which we fight, and how we treat our enemies, can be a witness to them?”

He stressed the importance of teaching one’s children these ideas about self-defense, because public education systems and the media bombard young minds with commands not to offend anyone, but to “endure evil and be a doormat for the wicked.”

Van Wyk did his part to educate the public by helping to found Gun Owners of South Africa. He noted crime is out of control in South Africa, but the South African government is bent on disarming the population, thus taking away the ability of citizens to defend themselves from criminals.

image: http://www.wnd.com/files/2012/01/bc_shooting_back.jpg

bc_shooting_back“Women in South Africa are feeling particularly vulnerable because of the extremely high incidence of rape and murder,” Van Wyk stated. “They have started a division of GOSA called ‘Girls on Fire,’ through which they are educating women on the advantages and rights of female firearm ownership in South Africa.”He said “Girls on Fire” launched in 2015 with a “16 Days of Action for No Violence Against Women and Children” education campaign. The goal is to enable and empower women to stop being victims who have to protest the current state of affairs and start protecting themselves and their families.

Ultimately, women face the same reality as men, according to Van Wyk.

“When a bad guy has a gun, only a good guy with a gun can resist him,” he said. “Not much else will do the job.”

Can Christians use guns to defend themselves? Yes, they can — and they must. Get your copy of “Shooting Back: The Right and Duty of Self-Defense” from the WND Superstore today.
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2016/07/dodge-my-bullets-st-james-massacre-hero-pushes-self-defense/#0qSZByPohbMbuF6T.99

Video: Pope demands protection for Christians after Pakistan attack

Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2016/07/dodge-my-bullets-st-james-massacre-hero-pushes-self-defense/#0qSZByPohbMbuF6T.99

Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2016/07/dodge-my-bullets-st-james-massacre-hero-pushes-self-defense/#0qSZByPohbMbuF6T.99

It was 23 years ago that Charl Van Wyk was sitting peacefully in the congregation at St. James Church in Cape Town, South Africa, when terror struck. As Van Wyk has told WND, “The moment of chaos and carnage unfurled is forever etched in my mind.” On July 25, 1993, while young people were singing […]

Source: ‘Dodge my bullets!’ Church-massacre hero pushes self-defense

Authorities say a Florida police officer shot and wounded an autistic man’s caretaker following reports of a man threatening to shoot himself

Source: Police in Fla. shoot caretaker next to autistic man playing in street – CBS News

Israel has admitted for the first time that it has been giving Ethiopian Jewish immigrants birth-control injections, often without their knowledge or consent.

The government had previously denied the practice but the Israeli Health Ministry’s director-general has now ordered gynaecologists to stop administering the drugs. According a report in Haaretz, suspicions were first raised by an investigative journalist, Gal Gabbay, who interviewed more than 30 women from Ethiopia in an attempt to discover why birth rates in the community had fallen dramatically.

One of the Ethiopian women who was interviewed is quoted as saying: “They [medical staff] told us they are inoculations. We took it every three months. We said we didn’t want to.” It is alleged that some of the women were forced or coerced to take the drug while in transit camps in Ethiopia.

The drug in question is thought to be Depo-Provera, which is injected every three months and is considered to be a highly effective, long-lasting contraceptive.

Nearly 100,000 Ethiopian Jews have moved to Israel under the Law of Return since the 1980s, but their Jewishness has been questioned by some rabbis. Last year, the Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, who also holds the health portfolio, warned that illegal immigrants from Africa “threaten our existence as a Jewish and democratic state”.

Haaretz published an extract from a letter sent by the Ministry of Health to units administering the drug. Doctors were told “not to renew prescriptions for Depo Provera for women of Ethiopian origin if for any reason there is concern that they might not understand the ramifications of the treatment”.

Sharona Eliahu Chai, a lawyer for the Association of Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), said: “Findings from investigations into the use of Depo Provera are extremely worrisome, raising concerns of harmful health policies with racist implications in violation of medical ethics. The Ministry of Health’s director-general was right to act quickly and put forth new guidelines.”

 

Israel has admitted for the first time that it has been giving Ethiopian Jewish immigrants birth-control injections, often without their knowledge or consent.

Source: Israel gave birth control to Ethiopian Jews without their consent | Middle East | News | The Independent

LSD: Distortions of Vision and Pain

This paper is a manually-entered copy of the complete published text of the 1979paper. The author thanks the editors of erstwhile Perceptual and Motor Skillsfor thisspecial permission. The published text pagination has been preserver, except thathyphenated words and REFERENCES crossing page boundaries have been gathered tothe page on which they were begun.In addition to this Preface, one minor change has been made to correct a newly-founderror on the published p. 518, an error which is explained the

The prohibition of MDMA and hallucinogenic mushrooms restricts “cognitive liberty,” according to some activists.

By the time drug-policy lawyer Charlotte Walsh took to the stage on the final day of the recent Horizons Psychedelic Conference, we had already heard several persuasive talks on the benefits of psychedelic substances. Rick Doblin had spoken about the successful treatment of PTSD with MDMA, Draulio Barros de Araujo described his work combatting depression with ayahuasca, and Stephen Ross discussed his study administering psilocybin to cancer patients.

I had met Ross two years prior, while covering his psychedelic research. The psychiatrist had spent years and a small fortune obtaining the government’s permission to run an extremely limited study. The stakes were high. Without exemptions from the DEA and other agencies, Ross and his NYU team could have faced punishments as severe as life imprisonment. But the risk was worth it: The researchers were able to critically reduce end-of-life anxiety in the vast majority of their patients with targeted therapy aided by a single dose of psilocybin.

These clinical gains run counter to increasingly prohibitive trends exemplified by Holland’s 2008 ban on hallucinogenic mushrooms and the U.K.’s Psychoactive Substances Act of 2016. This recent law automatically renders illegal all substances capable of altering emotions or mental functioning unless specifically exempted.

According to Charlotte Walsh of the anti-prohibitionist Ayahuasca Defense Fund, that kind of blanket drug prohibition is a violation of international human-rights law. Walsh sees parallels between the drug war and the legal battles for racial equality, as well as gay and reproductive rights. She and her colleagues across Europe and North America hope to use the U.S. Bill of Rights and the European Charter on Human Rights to build a cognitive-liberty-based case against drug prohibition.

I spoke with Walsh recently about her current efforts and the prospects for success at home and abroad.

Morin: What would a human-rights-based drug defense look like?

Walsh: Generally, when people are prosecuted for psychedelic use, the defense focuses on technicalities rather than challenging the prohibitive framework itself. On the rare occasions when they do challenge prohibition, they tend to employ a rights-based framework—namely, arguing that their client’s human rights have been infringed by psychedelic drug prohibition. Rights-based defenses have historically been either pleas for therapeutic or religious exemptions from prohibition.

Morin: What is the legal basis for drug prohibition?

Walsh: Within the parameters of the U.K. Misuse of Drugs Act [equivalent to the U.S. Controlled Substances Act] the issue is ostensibly based around the idea of harm. We have an Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, which is a group of scientists in different realms that the government consults when a drug is going to be scheduled or reclassified. The council then carries out a wholesale review of the substance and makes a recommendation for or against prohibition or reclassification. There has been a trend though where the government will ask the Advisory Council to carry out such a review and then just completely ignore their results and do what they want to do. As a stark example, when MDMA was being reevaluated for reclassification, before the results were even in, they issued a public statement saying, effectively, “Don’t worry, whatever they find, we’re not going to change anything.”
An alcohol user can alter their consciousness freely despite the proven risks while a psychedelic user faces heavy punishment.

Morin: What results have they been ignoring?

Walsh: There was an extensive U.K. government study carried out in 2010 by a team under David Nutt that measured various substances in terms of harms to society and the individual. That study showed that alcohol is the overall forerunner in terms of harm, and tobacco comes close after that. A lot of the Class A drugs [equivalent to Schedule I in the US] and psychedelic drugs in particular were at the opposite end of that scale showing very low risk of harm.

Morin: Did the government refute the study or did they ignore it?

Walsh: They basically ignored it. In relation to the alcohol and tobacco findings, obviously nobody has called for their prohibition. An alcohol user can alter their consciousness freely despite the proven risks while a psychedelic user faces heavy punishment. It’s arbitrary discrimination. The government’s response to the Nutt study has been that drug policy isn’t based solely on science, it’s also based on cultural and historical precedent.

Morin: Is that an admission that the harm-based justification for prohibition no longer applies?

Walsh: It’s certainly evidence that it’s applied inconsistently and arbitrarily. From a human-rights-based perspective, everybody’s rights should be protected equally unless there’s a good reason why you’re treating a group differently. I don’t think that saying “culturally and historically this is what we’ve always done” is legitimate. You can’t say that about racial discrimination, for instance.

Morin: So, the current argument is that illegal drugs are bad because they’re illegal?

Walsh: Basically, and it goes beyond that. We have a recently elected Conservative government in the U.K., and they’ve produced something called the Psychoactive Substances Act. It’s a piece of legislation that renders it unlawful to trade in any substance capable of producing a psychoactive effect of any kind regardless of harm or benefit. If you read the text of the Act, it’s extraordinary, most notably its lack of any reference to the concept of harm.

Morin: How do they define “psychoactive” exactly?

Walsh: Any substance that alters your emotional state or mental functioning. It openly states that we [the government] think we have the right to stop you from altering your psychological state. It’s strange that’s something they believe they should have the power to do.

Morin: I assume there are exemptions for alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine.

Walsh: Yes, for culturally accepted substances. This legislation is potentially so broad that prior to its enactment the government felt compelled to write to bishops to reassure them that the incense used in church services would not become illegal, despite its being mildly psychoactive.

Morin: What does that kind of blanket ban indicate to you in terms of legislative intent?

Walsh: The tradition in English law was always to intervene as little as possible. That concept has been dying in more recent years. This reverses that presumption, replacing it with an assumption that you can’t do something unless the government explicitly says you can. This violates classic liberalism, where you have the concept of limitations of power, as most famously espoused by legal theorist John Stuart Mill. How much power can the state legitimately hold over the individual? Mill laid down the principle as prevention of harm to others. So, from that perspective, the kind of paternalism we’re seeing, both in the operation of the Misuse of Drugs Act and the fundamental aims of this new piece of legislation is illegitimate.
Even if you could make a case for that kind of paternalism, how can imprisonment possibly be for our own good?

Morin: Paternalism in terms of protecting people from themselves?

Walsh: Exactly. It’s inherently infantilizing. Even if you could make a case for that kind of paternalism, how can imprisonment possibly be for our own good? In the majority of cases, the primary and often only harm being suffered by the individual is due to the punishment imposed rather than from the substance use itself.

Morin: How do you intend to build a human-rights case against drug prohibition?

Walsh: There are different ways in which you can approach it. Article 8 [in the European Convention on Human Rights] guarantees the right to privacy. In Mexico, there was a Supreme Court ruling that for individuals to grow and use cannabis was a human right connected to the right to privacy. Here in the U.K. recently, there was an all-party parliamentary group looking at drug-policy reform, and one of the things that they said is that drug-possession laws are potentially a breach of our Article 8 right to privacy. That’s the first time I’ve ever seen an official source using that kind of human rights-based argument. I think that is a really promising development.

Morin: The suggestion is that drug use should be a private choice?

Walsh: It should be a private choice as long as it doesn’t harm others. The vast majority of police stops and searches in our streets are for drugs rather than anything else, which is an obvious violation of privacy. Read more broadly, the right to privacy equates with our ability to become who we want to be. Mill, again, was a strong proponent of experiments in living as an important means for self-discovery. The question is, should we be entrusting the government to determine what’s valuable to us? It’s through our own choices, including whether or not to ingest substances, that we engage in a process of self-creation.

Morin: It seems like there are stronger laws in place to prevent a patient from being medicated against their will than there are permitting self-medication. How similar are those two concepts?

Walsh: It’s based on the same argument—the freedom to control your own consciousness and the mechanisms of your thinking. With psychedelics, it’s one of those areas where people who have experienced profound alterations of consciousness will often see merit in these arguments, and people who haven’t are often not very open to them. I think you have to be very careful about how you construct your argument. It’s about liberty. It’s about an abuse of state powers. You want to get people on board who are aren’t necessarily interested in altering their consciousness, but who are interested in curbing what the state can and can’t do.

Morin: Medical arguments have broadly relaxed prohibition of marijuana in this country. Do you see that extending further?

Walsh: I do, but I also think that the medical model is problematic in its own right. I think we need more of a holistic definition of health. Right now, we’re talking about simply the absence of illness—whether it’s physical or mental. We should be talking about allowing individuals to flourish, to develop beyond basic well-being.

Morin: Besides the right to privacy, what other rights do you see influencing the legitimacy of prohibition?

Walsh: Article 9 guarantees religious freedom, so, basically, if you consider the drug you use to be a sacrament, then banning it is a form of religious persecution. In the States, you have a more doctrinal approach to what constitutes a religion. There’s a test. Is there a holy book and a central belief system? There’s a list of things you can work through. In Europe, we don’t have that. We have this loose interpretation of what religious belief is. It can even cover atheism, for example. Indeed, any belief system of significance to you can potentially be covered. The court tends to accept that, but then they say that your ability to manifest that religious belief—for example by drinking ayahuasca—has to be balanced against the public interest in you not doing it. And so, in cases involving ayahuasca, they’ve said that its illegality is proof of its danger, which in and of itself proves that the public interest in your not taking it outweighs your interest in taking it. It’s a circular argument that renders the whole process absolutely meaningless.

Morin: Taking your example, can you talk about why someone would want to use ayahuasca?

Walsh: There have been a lot of studies, and the overall conclusion seem to be that the long-term psychological well-being of people who use it is actually higher than control groups who have never used it. It has thousands of years of cultural history behind it. Then, of course you have the anecdotal evidence of many individuals saying that using ayahuasca has been a very beneficial and transformative experience.

Morin: A lot of people seem to think that the religious argument has the best chance of succeeding here in the U.S.

Walsh: Right. It has already been successful in the U.S. Courts have allowed exemptions in certain cases with ayahuasca, and with the Native American Church and peyote. There have been similar rulings in other countries—Holland and Chile, for example, but nothing like that here in the U.K. Interestingly, in the U.K., judges rejecting human-rights arguments have argued that they are bound by the international system of drug prohibition and therefore can’t make exemptions. In U.S. courts though, that sort of argument has been discarded with barely a second glance. The prosecution has raised the fact that exemptions are against international law and the judiciary has said that it doesn’t trump religious freedom.

Morin: If religious freedom is weaker in the U.K., is there a freedom of speech argument that could be made instead?

Walsh: More broadly under Article 9 is the right to freedom of thought, which is closely linked to freedom of speech, given that our thoughts precede our speech. From that perspective, the idea is that we should be allowed to think what we want—and it’s not just the actual contents of thinking that are important here, but also the processes of thinking. If psychedelics and other drugs can allow you to access different mind states, by preventing access, we’re interfering with true freedom of thought. These substances, as precursors, allow you to think in entirely different ways—which can be beneficial. The idea that psychedelics can actually improve an individual’s life is rarely taken into account, and taking them because they give pleasure is not even considered—as if pleasure were something to be ashamed of. The individual shouldn’t be required to prove that these substances are risk-free, because few things in life are—rather it should be up to the state to prove, with scientific evidence, that the risks justify the damage to our civil liberties. In the absence of that, it is impossible that say that this is truly a free society.

Source: Do Psychedelic Drug Laws Violate Human Rights? – The Atlantic

Japan has officially stated to the UN that it did not force Asian women to become sex slaves during World War II. This comes despite the Japanese government signing a landmark deal with South Korea, settling the issue of “comfort women” a month ago.

Japan has officially stated to the UN that it did not force Asian women to become sex slaves during World War II. This comes despite the Japanese government signing a landmark deal with South Korea, settling the issue of “comfort women” a month ago.

Tokyo was asked to provide written answers to questions put forward by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. The Japanese government stated that there was no evidence that the women were forced into sexual slavery as it sent the reply ahead of the organization’s planned committee meeting, which starts February 15 in Geneva.

“The government of Japan has conducted a full-scale fact-finding study on the comfort women issue since the early 1990s when the issue started to be taken up as a political issue between Japan and the Republic of Korea,” the Japanese statement said, as cited by the Yonhap News Agency.

The Japanese authorities said they conducted a study into the issue, which looked at documents from various Japanese government agencies. They also spoke to relevant individuals and former military figures.

“Forceful taking away of comfort women by the military and government authorities could not be confirmed in any of the documents,” it said.

The claims led to a damning response from South Korea for its continued denials regarding its coercion of Korean women into sexual slavery.

“Seoul should officially rebuke this argument and discuss the issue from square one as Japan has broken the deal,” said Yoon Mi-hyang, head of the Korean Council for Women Drafted for Military Sexual Slavery by Japan, a non-government organization for the victims, according to the Korean Times.

Japan’s Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said on January 18 that the term “comfort women” should not be used to describe “sex slaves.”

“The term ‘sex slaves’ doesn’t match the facts, and (the Japanese government) believes it should not be used,” Kishida stated, as cited by the Japan Times.

Kishida also said the South Korean government has confirmed that the formal term used by Seoul is “victims of the comfort women issue of the Japanese military,” not “sex slaves.”

It had seemed in December that Japan was finally ready to concede that it was ready to apologize for the enslaving of tens of thousands of ‘comfort women’ from South Korea.

The agreement on December 28 between South Korea and Japan was considered a landmark deal and concerns decades of animosity because of the failure to agree that Korean women were forced into sex slavery run by the Japanese empire for soldiers.

Under the deal, Japan said it would pay one billion yen (about $8.3 million) in compensation.

“The comfort women issue… occurred with the involvement of the Japanese military… and the Japanese government acutely feels its responsibility,” Kishida said, according to Channel News Asia. He added that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has expressed an “apology and repentance from the bottom of his heart” to those affected by the tragedy.

However, following Sunday’s comments by the Japanese government, the Korean authorities are now questioning whether the December agreement was sincere.

“The Korean government should respond to the undermining of the agreement sternly,” Kim Yeol-su, an international politics professor at Sungshin Women’s University said, according to the Korean Times. “It reflects that Japan did not engage in the deal sincerely in the first place.”

Meanwhile, the Korean Foreign Ministry says it is considering countermeasures following the Japanese declaration.

“As there was no exact wording on coercion in the deal, it is not a matter of breaking the accord,” Cho June-hyuck, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said. “But we are mulling over how to respond to such a move since we are taking it as an official position of the Japanese government.”

Source: Japan denies forced sex slavery WWII to UN, despite signing landmark deal with S. Korea — RT News

Dykes after your daughters! Yikes Dikes!

Source: Police charge Florence City School nurse with sex crime against student | WHNT.com

The Florence Police Department has arrested and charged a Florence City School staff nurse Tuesday with two felonies for having a sexual relationship with a student.

Lorie Gean Earwood, 45, surrendered to police Tuesday. Florence Police Chief Ron Tyler said Earwood is accused of having a sexual relationship with an 18-year-old female student. Earwood is charged with two Class B felonies and two Class A misdemeanors alleging she had a sexual relationship with the student.

A YouGov poll published this past September found Americans almost evenly divided, with 44 percent favoring legalization of prostitution, and 46 percent opposed. That’s up from 38 percent support for legalization in 2012. Amnesty International is among the organizations seeking to recognize people’s right to, in the organization’s words, “the full decriminalization of all aspects of consensual sex work.”

Opponents of commercial sex find themselves on the wrong side of shifting public opinion, so they pull a little rhetorical sleight of hand to get around that inconvenient word “consensual.” The implication of the “trafficking” terminology is that prostitutes are slaves—and they’re being hustled off to a major sporting event near you.

“Coercion is much rarer than ‘trafficking’ fetishists pretend it is,” insists Reason contributor and former call girl Maggie McNeill. “The term ‘trafficking’ is used to describe many different things along a broad spectrum running from absolutely coercive to absolutely not coercive, yet all of them are shoehorned into a lurid, melodramatic and highly-stereotyped narrative.”

Evidence for McNeill’s take is apparent in the difficulty authorities often have in convincing the trafficking “victims” they rescue that they’re in need of heroic intervention into their lives.

“A lot of times they don’t see themselves as victims,” Bay Area prosecutor Jennifer Madden told the Associated Press. “They don’t fully grasp how they’ve come into this, how they are being exploited, and they may not be amenable to services.”

Coercion is beside the point to a lot of activists. “[T]rafficking occurs even if the woman consents,” wrote the University of Rhode Island’s Donna Hughes, a prominent voice on the issue, in a 2000 Journal of International Affairs article.

And government officials and anti-trafficking activists are poised to rescue a wave of such trafficking “victims” when the Super Bowl comes to town. Once they convince them that they’re victims, that is.

They may be waiting a long time.

“There is no evidence that large sporting events cause an increase in trafficking for prostitution,” the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) reported in 2011. GAATW, which differentiates between consensual sex workers and those subject to coercion, points out that short-term events are likely to be more profitable for organizations and officials playing off of fears than for sex workers who have to pay traveling expenses out of whatever extra profits they take in from sports fans.

The Arizona State University’s Office of Sex Trafficking Intervention Research—an outfit that combines research activities with a militantly anti-sex work stance—agrees. The organization “found no evidence indicating the 2014 Super Bowl was a causal factor for sex trafficking in the northern New Jersey area in the days preceding the game.”

Last year, the ASU group repeated its efforts, ultimately reporting “there is no empirical evidence that the Super Bowl causes an increase in sex trafficking compared to other days and events throughout the year.”

There was, however, “a noticeable increase in those activities intended to locate victims from both law enforcement and service provision organizations”—activities of the sort including press conferences featuring district attorneys. So, the surge was in cops and busybodies looking for something to do. Hmmm. Maybe—No, never mind.

In a 2014 article for Reason on Super Bowl sex scares, McNeill pointed out that the grandiosity of warnings about Super Bowl sex trafficking is matched by the bullshit clinging to authorities’ subsequent reporting of event-related arrests. Anti-trafficking efforts in Tampa “bagged exactly one quarry, a 14-year-old pimped by two rather clueless individuals on Craigslist under the heading ‘Super Bowl Special’ (a detail regularly repeated as part of the prohibitionist catechism since then).” Officials claim other rescues of supposed sex slaves, but the details are always vague, often include vice busts unrelated to the big game—and even then fall dramatically below the numbers initially tossed about.

Activists and politicians warn of a roving horde of “trafficked” prostitutes that researchers just can’t find.

Source: There’s No Tidal Wave of Sex Slaves Descending on the Super Bowl – Reason.com

The Miami-Dade police officer pulled over by a civilian for allegedly speeding, the scene captured on video that has now gone viral, was identified Monday as Daniel Fonticiella, a former Hammocks District officer who now works at PortMiami.

Police released little other information on Fonticiella — like his age or years of service with the department — except to say that an internal affairs investigation is under way after a complaint was filed Monday by a woman named Claudia Castillo.

Castillo, who spoke with Miami Herald news partner CBS 4, said she was running an errand when she spotted Fonticiella racing past her with his siren turned off.

“I think this merits some attention at a countywide level,” Castillo said. “Police officers speed all the time. That should not be an acceptable modus operandi. That’s not the way it works. That’s not the way it should work.”

On Sunday, Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Perez said Fonticiella’s command staff will investigate the incident.

Three separate cell phone videos taken from a mounted phone in her car and posted Friday shot Castillo into YouTube superstardom this weekend. Filmed during her pursuit of Fonticiella, the videos show the woman following the officer and finally catching up to him in traffic near the 27th Avenue exit of the Dolphin Expressway.

After she catches Fonticiella’s attention, he pulls over and approaches Castillo. Then the tables turn.

“The reason I pulled you over today is because I saw you, since Miller Drive when you were first jumping onto the Palmetto, and you were pushing 90 miles per hour,” Castillo tells the officer as he leans into her passenger window.

Says Fonticiella: “Really? OK.”

Then this from Castillo: “You passed me like I was standing still.”

At one point in the video the officer says he’ll slow down next time, then shows her his name and badge number, which she never requested.

PBA president John Rivera said Monday he saw “no evidence’’ that Fonticiella was speeding.

“However, if it were true, two wrongs don’t make a right,’’ he said. “Had something gone wrong, as in she got into a crash and hurt someone, she would be totally liable. The appropriate action would have been to write the car number down and contact the department. I felt the officer’s response was totally professional and he even offers up his name and badge. I commend him for his demeanor.”

The website Photography is Not a Crime was first to post the video on Saturday. Speeding police officers shot into the local consciousness in 2011 when Florida Highway Patrol Officer Donna Watts pulled over Miami police officer Fausto Lopez for speeding. The image was captured on video and Watts was openly ostracized by Miami police. She eventually filed a lawsuit and Lopez was later let go.

That led to a 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation by the South Florida Sun Sentinel into cops speeding. The newspaper used electronic-tolling data to prove police were racing at speeds as high as 130 miles per hour.

Last week, after Castillo pulled over Fonticiella, she told the officer she “just wanted to know: What’s the emergency?”

Said Fonticiella: “Um, I don’t know how fast I was going. But I can tell you this: I’m on my way to work right now. I don’t believe I was speedin

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article57815958.html#storylink=cpy

The Miami-Dade police officer pulled over by a civilian for allegedly speeding, the scene captured on video that has now gone viral, was identified Monday as Daniel Fonticiella, a former Hammocks District officer who now works at PortMiami.

Source: Miami-Dade cop captured on video by woman for speeding is identified | Miami Herald

Six Cleveland police officers have been fired in connection with a November 2012 car chase that ended with officers firing 137 bullets at a car, killing Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams, said Detective Steve Loomis, president of the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association.

Loomis identified the officers as Wilfredo Diaz, Brian Sabolik, Erin O’Donnell, Michael Farley, Chris Ereg and Michael Brelo.

Brelo, the only officer indicted in the incident, allegedly fired 49 of the shots, including 15 from the hood of the car carrying Russell and Williams. He was acquitted of manslaughter and felonious assault last year.

Police in a tweet Tuesday said six other officers were suspended without pay for up to a month and a 13th officer retired last year.

Loomis, a veteran of 23 years, vowed to get the fired officers’ jobs back. There is “no rhyme or reason” to the dismissals, and he said he and other officers are scratching their heads because the firings seem random, as if names were picked out of a hat.

“This is nothing but politics. I have every confidence in the world we’re going to get their jobs back. I’m not going to stand for it,” Loomis said.

How, he asked, can the six officers be fired when a grand jury opted not to indict 12 of the 13 officers and the sole remaining officer, Brelo, was acquitted by Cuyahoga County Judge John P. O’Donnell?

In his May 2015 decision, O’Donnell ruled that Brelo’s use of force was permissible because he had reason to believe he was threatened. And it couldn’t be proved that Brelo’s shots were the fatal ones, so the judge couldn’t issue a guilty verdict on the manslaughter charge, he said.

May 2015: Michael Brelo found not guilty at manslaughter trial

May 2015: Michael Brelo found not guilty at manslaughter trial 02:00

‘I don’t trust police’

After the verdict, protesters outside the courthouse chanted, “No justice, no peace,” a slogan popularized during the Michael Brown protests in Ferguson, Missouri, and the Eric Garner protests in New York.

The protests were largely peaceful, though at least 71 people were arrested that weekend for offenses including felonious assault, aggravated rioting, unlawful congregation and failure to disperse, police Chief Calvin Williams said.

Russell’s and Williams’ family members also frowned on the verdict.

“All I know is that I don’t trust police no more. No police. None,” Williams’ brother, Alfredo Williams, said. “I can’t recover from this. …This verdict isn’t real. This verdict is fake.”

Loomis informed CNN of the firings as high-ranking police and city officials held a news conference regarding the 22-mile chase. During the chase, there were 46 supervisors on duty, 18 of whom were involved in the pursuit, said police Cmdr. James Chura, calling the incident unprecedented. Of those supervisors, one was terminated, two were demoted and nine were suspended for from three to 30 days.

As for the 105 officers involved in the pursuit, 63 were suspended for between one and 10 days, he said.

“We said we would conduct a fair process, and I believe we have done that,” Mayor Frank Jackson said. “They will feel however they feel, but we conducted this in a fair way, with due process.”

What happened that night?

The chase started the night of November 29, 2012, when a couple in a car sped away from an undercover officer.

Their engine backfired, sputtering and producing a loud bang in the tailpipe. Prosecutors said officers mistook the noise for gunshots, and a high-speed chase ensued.

Investigators said as many as 62 police cars joined at speeds of up to 100 mph through the streets of Cleveland.

After the chase, Russell rammed a police car in a middle school parking lot, police said.

That’s when the bullets started flying.

An investigation revealed 13 police officers fired more than 100 times in eight seconds.

Brelo got out of his police car, climbed atop the hood of Russell’s car and “fired at least 15 shots … downward through the windshield into the victims at close range as he stood on the hood of Mr. Russell’s car,” Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Timothy McGlinty said.

Brelo told investigators he thought he and his partner were in danger, believing the couple in the car were shooting.

“I’ve never been so afraid in my life,” the former Marine told investigators. “I thought my partner and I would be shot and that we were going to be killed, at which point I drew my weapon and I shot through the windshield at the suspects.”

Russell and Williams were both homeless with a history of mental illness and drug use, according to Ohio’s Bureau of Criminal Investigations. Witnesses said they were most likely looking to buy drugs that night. A police officer ran a license plate check of the 1979 Chevy Malibu that Russell was driving. He had gotten it from a relative, and the check came back clean.

Still, the officer tried to pull him over for a turn signal violation. Russell then sped away.

Source: 6 Cleveland police officers fired for actions in chase – CNN.com

Imagine being charged with a DUI when it’s been hours since you’ve had a drink, only to later discover that your body brews its own alcohol.

That’s what happened to an upstate New York woman when she blew a blood alcohol level more than four times the legal limit. Just before Christmas in Hamburg, New York, a judge dismissed the charges after being presented with evidence the woman suffers from “auto-brewery syndrome.”

“I had never heard of auto-brewery syndrome before this case,” attorney Joseph Marusak told CNN on the condition his client’s identity remain anonymous. “But I knew something was amiss when the hospital police took the woman to wanted to release her immediately because she wasn’t exhibiting any symptoms.”

“That prompts me to get on the Internet and see if there is any sort of explanation for a weird reading,” adds Marusak. “Up pops auto-brewery syndrome and away we go.”

“I’m in touch with about 30 people who believe they have this same syndrome, about 10 of them are diagnosed with it,” said Panola College Dean of Nursing Barbara Cordell, who has studied the syndrome for years. “They can function at alcohol levels such as 0.30 and 0.40 when the average person would be comatose or dying. Part of the mystery of this syndrome is how they can have these extremely high levels and still be walking around and talking.”

Extremely rare condition

Also known as gut-fermentation syndrome, this rare medical condition can occur when abnormal amounts of gastrointestinal yeast convert common food carbohydrates into ethanol. The process is believed to take place in the small bowel, and is vastly different from the normal gut fermentation in the large bowel that gives our bodies energy.

First described in 1912 as “germ carbohydrate fermentation,” it was studied in the 1930s and ’40s as a contributing factor to vitamin deficiencies and irritable bowel syndrome. Cases involving the yeast Candida albicans and Candida krusei have popped up in Japan, and in 2013 Cordell documented the case of a 61-year-old man who had frequent bouts of unexplained drunkenness for years before being diagnosed with an intestinal overabundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or brewer’s yeast, the same yeast used to make beer.

Flat tire a blessing

It was a beautiful fall afternoon in 2014 when Marusak’s client met her husband at a restaurant for food and drinks. She consumed “four drinks between noon and 6 p.m.” says Marusak, “less than one drink an hour. We hired a local pharmacologist who said that a woman of her size and weight having four drinks in that period of time should be between 0.01 and 0.05 blood alcohol levels.” That would be beneath the legally impaired level of 0.08 BAC in New York state.

And here’s the “crazy thing,” says Marusak. “Her husband drives to meet friends and she is driving home. She gets a flat close to home but doesn’t want to change the tire so keeps on driving. Another driver sees her struggling with the car and calls it in as an accident. So if she hadn’t had that flat tire, she’d not know to this day that she has this condition.”

Because she blew a blood alcohol level of nearly 0.40, police procedure is to take the accused to a hospital, as that level is considered extremely life-threatening.

Instead of allowing his wife to be released as the hospital recommended based on her lack of drunken symptoms, the husband asked for tests to be run. Sure enough, Marusak says, the results showed a blood alcohol level of 0.30, hours and hours after her last drink. That prompted Marusak to do his own sleuthing.

“I hired two physician assistants and a person trained in Breathalyzers to watch her and take blood alcohol levels over a 12-hour period and had it run at the same lab used by the prosecution,” said Marusak. “Without any drinks, her blood level was double the legal limit at 9:15 a.m., triple the limit at 6 p.m. and more than four times the legal limit at 8:30 p.m., which correlates with the same time of day that the police pulled her over.”

Even more strange, says Marusak, is the fact that the woman exhibited no signs of the levels until she reached a blood alcohol level of between 0.30 and 0.40.

“That’s when she started to feel a bit wobbly on her feet.” Marusak explains that by pointing to the world of alcoholism, where the bodies of “functioning alcoholics” adapt to the high levels of booze in their blood.

Even though the Hamburg judge dismissed the case against his client, Marusak says it’s not over yet.

“I’ve heard the DA’s office says they plan to appeal. I’ll know more by the middle of January.”

Assistant Erie County District Attorney Christopher Belling confirmed a review of the judge’s decision is underway but declined to comment further.

In the meantime, Marusak’s client is treating her condition with anti-fungal medications and a yeast-free diet with absolutely no sugar, no alcohol and very low carbs. While that works for some, Cordell says, others relapse or find little relief

Source: Woman charged with DUI has ‘auto-brewery syndrome’ – CNN.com

What Deters is describing is the basic function of every police department across the country. Everyone from the street cops to the mayor depends on drivers being extorted for traffic violations. It’s what pays their salaries.

Arlington Heights, OH — For years, locals knew that the stretch of road running through the village of Arlington Heights was notorious for police officers separating motorists from their money.

Neighboring officials even went so far as to label the town a “speed trap.” In spite of being the smallest community in the county, the village of Arlington Heights had the busiest court in the region and even the state – thanks to the Arlington Heights police department and their disreputable speed trap.

According to a 2007 report from the Enquirer, the overwhelming majority of cases (93%) that pass through court in Arlington Heights, are for traffic fines alone.

Despite issuing and collecting a record number of traffic fines, the money from those fines never found its way to the village bank account. The clerk of courts and the deputy clerk of courts, with the help of the ticket writing cops, enriched themselves to the tune of $260,000 before they were finally caught in October.

Even thought he was met with backlash from the Arlington Heights Police department, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters, who called for the dissolution of the village in 2012, said that referring to the village as a “speed trap” is appropriate.

“Basically, they were setting up speed traps on I-75 to fund the municipal workings of that village – which they then stole,” he said. “I can’t quite put my finger on it, but there’s something off about a village that’s maybe a mile long setting up speed traps to raise money that then is used to fund a bunch of public employees. It just rubs me the wrong way.”

What Deters is describing is the basic function of every police department across the country. Everyone from the street cops to the mayor depends on drivers being extorted for traffic violations. It’s what pays their salaries.

Luckily for all the residents of Hamilton County, on Friday, the Arlington Heights police department was disbanded as a result of their years of revenue collection for criminals.

With the revenue collection arm now disolved, the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office will begin patrolling the tiny village.

“You get to a point where it just doesn’t make sense anymore,” Deters said. “I think they’ve taken a hard look at what they’re doing out there, and if they’re letting the sheriff do it now, they made the right call.”

Source: “Speed Trap Town” Dissolves Entire Police Dept After Years of Officials Getting Rich from Fines | Alternet

News Spike: 9/11: Jumpers Inc.

Balcony Scene (Or Unseen) Atop the World; Episode at Trade Center Assumes Mythic Qualities

By SHAILA K. DEWAN
Published: August 18, 2001
The affair of the balcony ended, if indeed it ever began, with the appearance in July of a slender book of curious title, obtainable in very few places, one of them being an art gallery in a frosted storefront on Broadway near Franklin Street.

Called ‘‘The B-Thing” and produced by four Vienna-based artists known collectively as Gelatin, the book is demure to the point of being oblique. What little explanation it contains appears to have been scribbled in ballpoint. Among the photos and schematic drawings, there are doodles of tarantulas with human heads.

In short, the book belies the extravagance of the feat it seems to document: the covert installation, and brief use, of a balcony on the 91st floor of the World Trade Center, 1,100 feet above the earth. Eight photographs — some grainy, all taken from a great distance — depict one tower’s vast eastern facade, marred by a tiny molelike growth: a lone figure dressed in a white jacket, standing in a lectern-size box.

The contemporary art world, of course, is rife with acts of subversion followed by boasting, which is known as ”documentation.” In that context, the beauty of the balcony was that it so literally pushed the envelope. Yet since that Sunday morning in March 2000, when the balcony was allegedly installed and, 19 minutes later, dismantled, the affair has taken on the outlines of an urban myth, mutated by rumors and denials among the downtown cognoscenti.

Although the book appears to seek notoriety, the artists have gone coy. Their dealer, who witnesses say watched the event from a hotel suite, now claims it never happened. Either the balcony was an elaborate hoax meant to look real, or the inverse is true: it really happened, and the closer it comes to being found out, the more those involved would prefer for everyone to think it was a hoax.

In the spring of 2000, Gelatin and 14 other artists shared free studio space on the 91st floor, where the group’s artmaking appeared to consist of building a clubhouse out of cardboard boxes.

But Ali Janka, a member of Gelatin reached by phone in Vienna, said that the blindered view afforded by the narrow windows had inspired them to find a way to step outside. ‘‘After you have a certain idea, you can’t go back,” he said, ”because everything else seems very weak compared to it.”

Mr. Janka was happy to talk about the project, at least at first. After weeks of planning, he said, one night Gelatin — he, Florian Reither, Tobias Urban and Wolfgang Gantner — waited in the studio until dawn. At the appointed moment, the four, wearing harnesses, unscrewed the aluminum moldings that hold the window in place and used two large suction cups to remove the glass (air pressure adds about 300 pounds to the effort). As warm air streamed past, they outfitted the window with a cantilevered box, big enough for only one person at a time.

”The amazing thing that happens when you take out a window,” Mr. Janka said, ”is that the whole city comes into the building.”

Other artists in the studio have heard rumors of the balcony, but most are dubious. ‘I can tell you that it never happened,’‘ said Geoffrey Detrani, whose space was next to Gelatin’s. ‘‘To remove a window would be a pretty serious structural breach.”

But Gelatin, fearing expulsion from the country, had gone to great lengths to conceal their plot. The clubhouse afforded privacy and storage. By prior agreement, the group confiscated all film and video of the project taken by invited witnesses.

Still, how did a balcony escape the notice of one of the most security-conscious office towers in the world? An examination of the security system revealed that it was focused on the ground floor and basement, Mr. Janka said, adding, ‘‘There’s no surveillance on the facade itself.”

That is true, said Cherrie Nanninga, the director of real estate for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which until recently ran the World Trade Center. Port Authority officials, shown a copy of ”The B-Thing” by a reporter, reacted with disbelief, then outrage. Although their own investigation turned up no evidence, Ms. Nanninga said, ‘‘we have no reason to believe it didn’t happen.”

Window removal is considered so dangerous that when it is done the streets below are cordoned off, she said. ”It was really a stupid and irrational act that in my view borders on the criminal,” she said, adding that the stunt had jeopardized the studio program, whose space is donated by the Trade Center.

Removing the window may have been dangerous, but according to Walter Friedman, the owner of Dependable Glass, which performs that service for the World Trade Center, it is not that difficult. All it takes is four guys, some readily available equipment — and nerve, Mr. Friedman said.

Nerve is not something Gelatin lacks. They specialize in projects that require participants to sign a waiver.

In a piece called ”The Human Elevator,” strong men on scaffolding hoisted people to the roof of a three-story building in Los Angeles. And patrons in Munich were greased with baby oil and invited to slide naked down an esophaguslike chute formed by the bellies of a crew of overweight Germans.

Although Gelatin, which is representing Vienna in the Venice Biennale, has not shrunk from physical risk, they seem to think that merely discussing the balcony with a reporter was dangerous, perhaps because they are currently seeking permission to live on a vacant lot on Canal Street, as part of a forthcoming exhibition.

‘If you write about the balcony, maybe you can just not write about it too much,” Mr. Janka called back to say after the initial interview, the first of several calls protesting the appearance of an article, despite the fact that the artists had published the book.

To others involved in the project, it seemed reasonable that the appearance of ”The B-Thing” meant secrecy was no longer necessary. Josh Harris, the Internet entrepreneur once known for holding extravagant art parties, explained that Leo Koenig, the 24-year-old art dealer who represents Gelatin, got him involved.

The night before the B-Thing, Mr. Harris said, he rented a top-floor suite at the Millennium Hilton, across the street from the Gelatin studio, and invited people to what guests described as a night of decadence. Near dawn, he and several others took cameras and boarded a helicopter, communicating with Gelatin via cell phone.

‘We had to fly twice around the building before we could see them,’‘ said Mr. Harris, who is thanked in the book.

Afterward, Gelatin appeared at the hotel, where their success was toasted at a euphoric breakfast, according to five other witnesses, including Tanya Corrin, a video producer and writer, and David Leslie, a performance artist. ‘‘We just applauded the gutsy originality of it,” Ms. Corrin said. ”I think we all left feeling, wow, we just did something amazing, and nobody knows.”

Mr. Koenig now says the balcony never happened and, at any rate, he didn’t see it. The book, which costs $35 and was printed in a run of 1,200 copies, is meant to provoke questions about its veracity, he said.

At the suggestion that the project might have been faked, Mr. Harris seemed almost offended. He produced March 2000 credit card bills bearing charges of $2,167.44 from the Millennium Hilton and $1,625 from Helicopter Flight Service.

At about the same time that Mr. Harris was digging up proof, Gelatin was removing almost every trace of it from their Web site.

Moukhtar Kocache, the director of the studio program, insisted that the photos of the balcony were obviously faked. But digital manipulation experts disagreed. George Dash, the co-owner of Nucleus Imaging on East 30th Street, and a colleague, John Grasso, used magnifying loupes to examine a copy of ”The B-Thing.” Neither could detect inconsistencies. ”The angles are all too perfect,” Mr. Grasso said. ”It looks real to me. Absolutely. I’ve been doing this for 22 years.”

The balcony may be an art prank in the lineage of Yves Klein, who in 1960 disseminated a picture of himself leaping blithely out a window, an image revealed years later to be the product of deftly spliced negatives. But in its audacity, it seems more akin to tricksters who tested the limits of the World Trade Center in the 1970’s, including Philippe Petit, who walked a high wire strung between the towers.

‘This building needs things like that to happen, because otherwise it would die inside,” said Mr. Janka, who was under the impression that Mr. Petit had been deported for his action.

Although the Port Authority has not yet decided what, if any, action it will take against Gelatin, Mr. Janka might be relieved to learn that Mr. Petit, who still lives in New York, was simply required to give the city a free performance. He obliged by walking a tightrope to the top of the Belvedere Castle.

Photos: Members of Gelatin in 1998, when their exhibition at the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center included a 25-foot walk-up tower of discarded furniture parts. (P.S. 1); Photographs from ”The B-Thing,” a book produced by Gelatin, show someone on a temporary balcony on the World Trade Center, top; a drawing of the cantilevered balcony, above; and a view from inside the 91st-floor studio from which the balcony was hung, left. Unless the whole episode is a hoax, which some of those involved would prefer that people believe. So they say.

Source: News Spike: 9/11: Jumpers Inc.

Woman Says She Endured 8 Days In Psych Ward Because Cops Didn’t Believe BMW Was Hers”I do think race played a part in this.”Headshot of Christopher MathiasChristopher MathiasNational Reporter, The Huffington PostPosted: 09/11/2015 04:02 PM EDT | Edited: 09/11/2015 05:57 PM EDTPIX11NEW YORK — Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. In her first on-camera interview about her ordeal, which aired Thursday, the 32-year-old told PIX11 that it was all a “nightmare.”It’s a nightmare, Brock’s lawyer told The Huffington Post, that never would have happened if she weren’t African-American. Brock sued the city earlier this year in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. She contends that her constitutional rights under the Fourth and 14th Amendments were violated and that she suffered “unwanted and unwarranted intrusion of her personal integrity, loss of liberty [and] mental anguish.” The suit details how Brock pulled up to a traffic light in Harlem on Sept. 12, 2014, the music on her car stereo playing loudly. An NYPD officer approached her and asked why she was driving without her hands on the steering wheel, according to the suit. “I said I was dancing, I am at a light,” Brock told PIX11. “He asked me to get out of the car.”For unclear reason, Brock contends, she was taken into custody and transported to the NYPD’s 30th Precinct, where she was held for a few hours before being released without being charged with any crime. She said she was told to come back the next day to pick up her car, a 2003 BMW 325Ci.When she showed up at a police substation to get the car the next day, Brock said, “I just felt like from the moment I said I owned a BMW, I was looked at as a liar. They put me in handcuffs and said they just need to put me in handcuffs to take me to my car. And I said OK, whatever it’s gonna take to get to my car.””Then EMS approached me,” she continued. “And they said we’re gonna take you to your car. And I’m like, in an ambulance? I’m going to my car in an ambulance? I’m going to my car in an ambulance? I was just so confused.”Brock was taken instead to Harlem Hospital, where medical records obtained by her attorney, Michael Lamonsoff, show she was injected with powerful sedatives and forced to take doses of lithium.”He held onto me and then the doctor stuck me in the arm and I was on a stretcher and I woke up to them taking my clothes off, specifically my underwear,” Brock tearfully recalled for PIX11’s Nicole Johnson. “Then I went back out again. When I woke up the next day, I felt like I was in a nightmare. I didn’t understand why that was happening to me.” Medical records also show that over the course of her eight-day stay, personnel at the hospital repeatedly tried to get Brock to deny three things before she could be released: that she owned the BMW, that she was a professional banker, and that President Barack Obama followed her on Twitter. The lawsuit says it was these three assertions that were the basis for the city determining that Brock was delusional and to diagnose her with bipolar disorder. But according to Lamonsoff, Brock had no history of mental illness. She did own the BMW. At the time, she was employed as a banker and had worked at Citibank, Chase and Astoria Bank. And Obama does follow Brock on Twitter, just as he follows 640,000 other people. When Brock was finally released from the hospital, the lawsuit states, she was slapped with a $13,000 medical bill.A white woman would not have been treated like that, Lamonsoff argues.Courtesy of Michael Lamonsoff”If a white woman was trying to reclaim her BMW impounded by police, would she have been made a victim?” he said to HuffPost. “Would she have been questioned? Would she have been subject to sarcastic comments? Would she be made to justify who she was in order to ask for help? I don’t think so. I do think race played a part in this.”Institutional bias against African-Americans is well-documented and contributes to the racial disparities in how laws are enforced. Just this week, James Blake, formerly the fourth-ranked men’s tennis player in the world, was tackled and handcuffed at a midtown Manhattan hotel by police officers who confused him for a suspect in a crime. Blake, who is black, suffered cuts and bruises and was detained for about 15 minutes, until officers realized who he was. “In my mind, there’s probably a race factor involved, but no matter what, there’s no reason for anybody to do that to anybody,” Blake said after the incident.Responding to Brock’s lawsuit earlier this summer, the city claimed in court filings that she had been “acting irrational, she spoke incoherently and inconsistently, and she ran into the middle of traffic on Eighth Ave” during her encounter with police.Lamonsoff told HuffPost that “those allegations

Source: Woman Says She Endured 8 Days In Psych Ward Because Cops Didn’t Believe BMW Was Hers

Women go topless for #FreetheNipple walk

Hundreds showed support for Kentucky’s first march, part of a nationwide campaign.

Standing on a picnic table in the Highlands’ Willow Park, 18-year-old Nan Elpers removed her top as cameras started to roll.

Stone-faced, she held her shirt to her side, taking in the scene. Beside her on the table, women held #FreetheNipple posters. In front of her, hundreds of men, women and children stopped talking to take photos or show support. Within seconds, many of them started to applaud.

It was a good turnout for Kentucky’s first #FreetheNipple walk, where hundreds of men and women joined a national movement that has sparked similar marches in 60 other cities around the world — including a recent Manhattan march that drew 300 topless women.

In the Cherokee Triangle park Saturday, dozens of still-covered women waited for Elpers to talk.

“Lina Esco started this campaign in New York to change public policy,” Elpers told the audience. “She did that. In New York, this is legal. In Kentucky, this is legal. This is not a protest. This is a promotion of the understanding, the acceptance and the personal acceptance of women’s bodies. We are not here to change laws. We are here to change minds.”

Women and men of all ages and sizes removed their shirts to participate in the walk, which headed from the park down Bardstown Road to the Douglass Loop and back, passing two farmers markets, numerous restaurants and dozens of filming men along the way.

Arric Fendwick, holding his phone camera up at an intersection on Bardstown Road, said he was filming the march for friends who didn’t believe it was happening.

“It is a shocking thing,” Fendwick said, “because it’s in the city limits, not on a nudist campus or on a beach or in a private home, in a backyard. It is shocking seeing women getting together, bonding and doing something they feel is a positive thing. … It’s a new generation now. Do what you feel.”

Twelve Louisville Metro Police Department officers escorted the march, blocking traffic and keeping the marchers to the sidewalks. Elpers said she was grateful for the city’s support after the event took on a life of its own, far exceeding the response she anticipated when she first made a Facebook event inviting friends to join her in the cause.

“One of the things that has been so important to me and made this event so much more real is that I’ve gotten comments from women and girls I know, then on Facebook, people that I’ve never met before have given me their very personal reasons for supporting this campaign and why they need it,” Elpers said.

Mariah Harrod and Michelle Kim, students at Centre College, drove from Danville, Ky., to attend the march after learning of the campaign through supporter and pop culture icon Miley Cyrus.

“I think it’s definitely time and it’s clearly unfair that women can’t reveal their nipples in a social setting without being like considered immoral, scandalized or even possibly arrested,” Harrod said.

Several of the women participating said they were unsure if they’d take off their tops or show their support while remaining clothed, but some chose to remove their shirts after seeing dozens of other women do so.

“That’s a huge thing,” Elpers said, “because this is as much a self-acceptance campaign as it is a public acceptance campaign, and it’s been really powerful for a lot of people here.”

Reach reporter Bailey Loosemore at 502-582-4646 or bloosemore@courier-journal.com.

Source: Women go topless for #FreetheNipple walk

A lawyer for Hammond’s family says autopsy results show the teen was shot through the driver’s side window from behind, indicating there was no danger to the officer.

via Lawyer: Officer who fatally shot teen says he had to push off oncoming car; police release ID | Fox News.

It’s World Breastfeeding Week and this got us thinking about how breastfeeding is equal parts wonderful and difficult for too many women today.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has long recommended that women breastfeed children to age one, a goal a lot of women find nearly impossible. With a typical paid maternity leave (if there is any paid leave at all) of just 12 weeks, many women end up back in the workplace far sooner than the one-year mark. And those moms often struggle with time constraints, policies that discourage breastfeeding, and finding clean, private spaces to pump breast milk. (Although that last one is true for nursing women in general.)

Chronic Bronchitis

www.COPD.com

Find Tools & Resources To Help

Manage Your COPD Today.

In 2012, McDonald’s was famously investigated by the U.S. Department of Labor in 2012 when a new mom was forced to clock out and reduce her hours in order to walk to a library to pump breast milk. (McDonald’s did respond to the investigation by paying back the employee’s lost wages and restoring her hours, but still.)

The good news is the tide may be changing, thanks to the hard work of breastfeeding advocates. With every sad story of a mom being shamed that goes viral, more people realize how important breastfeeding really is. One concrete example: the companies listening and making it easier for moms to feed their babies.

Our hat is off to these three large companies, which have instituted pro-breastfeeding policies for their employees or customers and are setting a great example for others in the process.

RELATED: 10 Myths and Facts About Breastfeeding

Netflix

It’s been a big week for Netflix employees, which announced that its offering employees a full year of paid maternity or paternity leave. This will undoubtedly make it easier for new moms to reach the recommendation of breastfeeding babies until age one. “This new policy, combined with our unlimited time off, allows employees to be supported during the changes in their lives and return to work more focused and dedicated,” Tawni Cranz, Netflix’s Chief Talent Officer, said on the company’s blog.

IBM

Moms who are nursing and traveling on business often have to ‘pump and dump,’ or throw out their breast milk because it is too complicated and expensive to ship or carry home. Not anymore, says IBM. The tech giant will launch a novel program in September that will provide moms with everything they need to ship their breast milk home while they are traveling for work.

According to the Washington Post, the new program will start with an app that will allow women to enter the travel location and choose how many temperature-controlled packages she will need to ship her breast milk home. IBM will deliver pre-addressed packages to the hotel’s front desk, ready for the employee to use.

RELATED: Breastfeeding May Reduce the Risk of the Most Common Childhood Cancer

Target

Target’s breastfeeding policy, recently posted on Facebook by Breastfeeding Mama Talk, has been getting kudos. The company supports breastfeeding “in any area” of their stores and states that, “If you see a woman breastfeeding in our stores, do not approach her. If she approaches you and asks for a location to breastfeed, offer the fitting room (do not offer the restroom as an option).” That’s a vast improvement over 2011, when breastfeeding women staged a ‘nurse in’ to protest the fact that a breastfeeding mom in Texas was asked to cover up in the store.

Helping to alleviate the worries of nursing moms is definitely a worthy cause more businesses should get behind.

RELATED: How This Breastfeeding Mom Fought Back Against A Stranger Who Shamed Her on Facebook

via 3 Companies That Are Getting It Right for Breastfeeding Moms – Health News and Views – Health.com.

Chicago police, ACLU reach deal on police ‘stop and frisk’ policyBy Suzannah GonzalesThe Chicago Police Department agreed on Friday to outside monitoring of “stop-and-frisk” searches by its officers following a report that found they checked a disproportionate number of blacks and made more stops than their peers in other cities.The second-largest U.S. police department will begin keeping more data about the stops, including the race, ethnicity and gender of those stopped, the reasons for stops and their outcomes.The data will be shared with the American Civil Liberties Union and with a former U.S. magistrate judge, who will issue public reports twice a year on the department’s use of the stop-and-frisk tactic and assess whether the police force is complying with U.S. law.The tactic has been controversial, with proponents saying it helps prevent violent crime and opponents arguing that black citizens and members of other minority ethnic groups are unfairly targeted by the stops.”Stop and frisk is disproportionately concentrated in the black community,” the ACLU said in the March report, which analyzed 250 stops in Chicago in 2012 and 2013.It said black Chicagoans constitute 32 percent of the city’s population but were subjected to 72 percent of all stops.Chicago police agreed to step up supervision and discipline of officers who violate department protocol and to boost training about appropriate stops.”It is imperative that we use every tool and resource in a way that is not only lawful but respectful of the residents we serve,” said Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy.Chicago police have been struggling with a spike in violent crime this year, with 252 murders reported as of late July, up 21 percent from the same period a year earlier. Reported shooting incidents also are up, by 16 percent, although property crimes including burglary and theft are down significantly.The agreement incorporated the bulk of the recommendations in the ACLU report, according to a statement by the department and group.”What we have done here is move past the litigation process and advanced directly to a collaborative process,” said Harvey Grossman, the ACLU’s legal director.A federal judge in 2013 found that stops by the New York Police Department, the nation’s largest police force, disproportionately targeted minorities.On Friday, the independent monitor charged with reviewing NYPD stop-and-frisk tactics proposed changes to the city’s patrolmen’s manual, which if accepted by a judge would become binding.The guidelines make clear that “furtive movements” or a person’s presence in a “high-crime” area are not sufficient reason for a stop. They also note that a person’s race may not be the only reason he or she is stopped by an officer, although they make clear that race may be among a group of identifying characteristics an officer uses.

via Chicago police, ACLU reach deal on police ‘stop and frisk’ policy | Reuters.

San Diego — A San Diego police officer awaiting trial on drunken driving and hit-and-run charges was found dead Monday of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home in Clairemont.The wife of Officer David C. Hall, 41, called authorities to their Ashford Street home at 9:52 a.m. reporting the suicide, San Diego police said.When officers arrived, they found Hall’s body next to a wall in the backyard of the house.Hall, a 14-year department veteran, pleaded not guilty in May to two charges of felony drunken driving causing injury, one charge of hit and run and an allegation that his blood-alcohol content was greater than 0.15 percent — a charge that would have increased prison time. If convicted of all of the charges, he faced a maximum sentence of three years and eight months.The charges stemmed from a Feb. 22 crash in Serra Mesa where a woman driving a gray Chevrolet Suburban reported that she was hit and injured by a drunken driver who left the scene.Hall, who was off duty at the time, was later arrested and placed on paid administrative duty.Police reports indicated that the officer’s blood-alcohol content was 0.32 percent, or four times the legal limit of 0.08.A judge had ordered Hall to attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings twice a week, and he was scheduled to appear in Superior Court on Thursday for a pretrial hearing.Hall was one of at least eight police officers accused of misconduct since February.“The San Diego Police Department was very aware of the stress he was under and had taken every effort to get Officer Hall the help he needed,” Police Chief William Lansdowne said Monday. “In fact, our newly formed wellness unit had met with him just yesterday. Unfortunately, even with the help and support provided, Officer Hall unexpectedly decided to take his own life.”Eleven San Diego police officers have committed suicide since 1981, according to the department.Lansdowne said Hall’s family did not wish to make any statements at this time. The officer is survived by his wife and three children.Hall worked many assignments in the Police Department since being hired in 1997, including patrol in the central division and later on specialized narcotics and parolee apprehension teams. He was transferred to the traffic division in 2008, where he worked accident investigations, until becoming a motorcycle officer in March 2010.His attorney has said that before the DUI allegations, Hall had a clean record and had received commendations for his work.Several neighbors who gathered near the police tape at Hall’s home Monday expressed shock at the death. They remembered him as a friendly neighbor who often waved as he came and went on his police motorcycle.He and his family rented a home in a nearby cul-de-sac until a few years ago, when they purchased the home on Ashford.One neighbor reported hearing what sounded like a gunshot about 9:30 a.m.“He was a very pleasant guy,” said Charles Steinmetz, who lives a few houses down. “It’s sad to lose a friend and neighbor. Our prayers go out to the family.”The death occurred four days after the Police Department memorialized slain child abuse Detective Donna Williams, 52, and her daughter, Briana, 18. The mother and daughter were killed on July 18 at their Rancho Peñasquitos home, and Williams’ son, Brian, 24, has been charged with murder in the deaths.Officer Brian Marvel, president of the San Diego Police Officers Association, commented about Hall’s death on Twitter: “Unfortunately, another tragedy has befallen the SDPD. Please keep him and his family in your prayers. God Bless.”

via Officer accused of DUI apparently kills himself | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com.

Dick Cheney reemerges: Bloodthirsty veep is back to promote endless war — just in time for 2016

Dick Cheney and his silly advocacy group are back to preach neoconservatism to the converted

Topics: Dick Cheney, 2016 Elections, Liz Cheney, Republicans, Alliance for a Strong America, Neoconservatism, neoconservatives, Iraq war, Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush, Foreign policy, National security,

Dick Cheney reemerges: Bloodthirsty veep is back to promote endless war -- just in time for 2016Dick Cheney (Credit: AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Do you remember what the Alliance for a Strong America is? Don’t feel too bad if you don’t, since there’s really no reason for you to have spent any time thinking about the non-profit group or its mission to “advocate for the policies needed to restore American power and pre-eminence.” But if that name does kindle some faint glimmer of recognition, it’s probably from the glut of press coverage that attended its unveiling around about this time last year.

The Alliance for a Strong America, you see, is Dick Cheney’s dark-money advocacy group. It was founded to fight back against the Obama administration’s foreign policy and educate the public on the need for America to demonstrate its exceptional nature through the vigorous application of explosives to foreign lands. Working with his daughter, failed Senate candidate Liz Cheney, the former vice president was going to remind the American public of just how much danger they are constantly in and how the only way to make the world safe is to blow parts of it up.

That, at least, was the plan. But the Alliance for a Strong America doesn’t really seem to have done much since then. Peruse the Alliance’s website and you’ll see that its main function seems to be occasionally linking to articles from conservative publications bashing Obama or praising Cheney (the last update was from March). The group’s YouTube page boasts just four videos: a launch video featuring Dick and Liz, and three clips of their media appearances (it hasn’t been updated since last August). Liz Cheney told the Casper Star-Tribune last year that she and her father intended for the Alliance to be “a center of gravity” on national security issues and “a place where people can come to get information to help them make a case and help make sure people recognize at the end of the day, our security relies on American strength and power around the world.” If that’s happening, then they’re doing a great job of keeping it a secret.

But now Dick and Liz Cheney are back and renewing the urgent mission they put off for a year. The two have a new book coming out in September, and the former VP just gave a big interview to the Wall Street Journal that can be best described as Classic Cheney – hawkishness, straw men in abundance, and the de rigeur 9/11 fearmongering:

Dick Cheney reemerges: Bloodthirsty veep is back to promote endless war — just in time for 2016 – Salon.com.

n the morning of August 17, 1971, nine young men in the Palo Alto area received visits from local police officers. While their neighbors looked on, the men were arrested for violating Penal Codes 211 and 459 (armed robbery and burglary), searched, handcuffed, and led into the rear of a waiting police car. The cars took them to a Palo Alto police station, where the men were booked, fingerprinted, moved to a holding cell, and blindfolded. Finally, they were transported to the Stanford County Prison—also known as the Stanford University psychology department.

They were willing participants in the Stanford Prison Experiment, one of the most controversial studies in the history of social psychology. (It’s the subject of a new film of the same name—a drama, not a documentary—starring Billy Crudup, of “Almost Famous,” as the lead investigator, Philip Zimbardo. It opens July 17th.) The study subjects, middle-class college students, had answered a questionnaire about their family backgrounds, physical- and mental-health histories, and social behavior, and had been deemed “normal”; a coin flip divided them into prisoners and guards. According to the lore that’s grown up around the experiment, the guards, with little to no instruction, began humiliating and psychologically abusing the prisoners within twenty-four hours of the study’s start. The prisoners, in turn, became submissive and depersonalized, taking the abuse and saying little in protest. The behavior of all involved was so extreme that the experiment, which was meant to last two weeks, was terminated after six days.

Less than a decade earlier, the Milgram obedience study had shown that ordinary people, if encouraged by an authority figure, were willing to shock their fellow-citizens with what they believed to be painful and potentially lethal levels of electricity. To many, the Stanford experiment underscored those findings, revealing the ease with which regular people, if given too much power, could transform into ruthless oppressors. Today, more than forty-five years later, many look to the study to make sense of events like the behavior of the guards at Abu Ghraib and America’s epidemic of police brutality. The Stanford Prison Experiment is cited as evidence of the atavistic impulses that lurk within us all; it’s said to show that, with a little nudge, we could all become tyrants.

And yet the lessons of the Stanford Prison Experiment aren’t so clear-cut. From the beginning, the study has been haunted by ambiguity. Even as it suggests that ordinary people harbor ugly potentialities, it also testifies to the way our circumstances shape our behavior. Was the study about our individual fallibility, or about broken institutions? Were its findings about prisons, specifically, or about life in general? What did the Stanford Prison Experiment really show?

The appeal of the experiment has a lot to do with its apparently simple setup: prisoners, guards, a fake jail, and some ground rules. But, in reality, the Stanford County Prison was a heavily manipulated environment, and the guards and prisoners acted in ways that were largely predetermined by how their roles were presented. To understand the meaning of the experiment, you have to understand that it wasn’t a blank slate; from the start, its goal was to evoke the experience of working and living in a brutal jail.

From the first, the guards’ priorities were set by Zimbardo. In a presentation to his Stanford colleagues shortly after the study’s conclusion, he described the procedures surrounding each prisoner’s arrival: each man was stripped and searched, “deloused,” and then given a uniform—a numbered gown, which Zimbardo called a “dress,” with a heavy bolted chain near the ankle, loose-fitting rubber sandals, and a cap made from a woman’s nylon stocking. “Real male prisoners don’t wear dresses,” Zimbardo explained, “but real male prisoners, we have learned, do feel humiliated, do feel emasculated, and we thought we could produce the same effects very quickly by putting men in a dress without any underclothes.” The stocking caps were in lieu of shaving the prisoner’s heads. (The guards wore khaki uniforms and were given whistles, nightsticks, and mirrored sunglasses inspired by a prison guard in the movie “Cool Hand Luke.”)

Often, the guards operated without explicit, moment-to-moment instructions. But that didn’t mean that they were fully autonomous: Zimbardo himself took part in the experiment, playing the role of the prison superintendent. (The prison’s “warden” was also a researcher.) /Occasionally, disputes between prisoner and guards got out of hand, violating an explicit injunction against physical force that both prisoners and guards had read prior to enrolling in the study. When the “superintendent” and “warden” overlooked these incidents, the message to the guards was clear: all is well; keep going as you are. The participants knew that an audience was watching, and so a lack of feedback could be read as tacit approval. And the sense of being watched may also have encouraged them to perform. Dave Eshelman, one of the guards, recalled that he “consciously created” his guard persona. “I was in all kinds of drama productions in high school and college. It was something I was very familiar with: to take on another personality before you step out on the stage,” Eshelman said. In fact, he continued, “I was kind of running my own experiment in there, by saying, ‘How far can I push these things and how much abuse will these people take before they say, ‘Knock it off?’ ”

Other, more subtle factors also shaped the experiment. It’s often said that the study participants were ordinary guys—and they were, indeed, determined to be “normal” and healthy by a battery of tests. But they were also a self-selected group who responded to a newspaper advertisement seeking volunteers for “a psychological study of prison life.” In a 2007 study, the psychologists Thomas Carnahan and Sam McFarland asked whether that wording itself may have stacked the odds. They recreated the original ad, and then ran a separate ad omitting the phrase “prison life.” They found that the people who responded to the two ads scored differently on a set of psychological tests. Those who thought that they would be participating in a prison study had significantly higher levels of aggressiveness, authoritarianism, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and social dominance, and they scored lower on measures of empathy and altruism.

Moreover, even within that self-selected sample, behavioral patterns were far from homogeneous. Much of the study’s cachet depends on the idea that the students responded en masse, giving up their individual identities to become submissive “prisoners” and tyrannical “guards.” But, in fact, the participants responded to the prison environment in all sorts of ways. While some guard shifts were especially cruel, others remained humane. Many of the supposedly passive prisoners rebelled. Richard Yacco, a prisoner, remembered “resisting what one guard was telling me to do and being willing to go into solitary confinement. As prisoners, we developed solidarity—we realized that we could join together and do passive resistance and cause some problems.”

What emerges from these details isn’t a perfectly lucid photograph but an ambiguous watercolor. While it’s true that some guards and prisoners behaved in alarming ways, it’s also the case that their environment was designed to encourage—and, in some cases, to require—those behaviors. Zimbardo himself has always been forthcoming about the details and the nature of his prison experiment: he thoroughly explained the setup in his original study and, in an early write-up, in which the experiment was described in broad strokes only, he pointed out that only “about a third of the guards became tyrannical in their arbitrary use of power.” (That’s about four people in total.) So how did the myth of the Stanford Prison Experiment—“Lord of the Flies” in the psych lab—come to diverge so profoundly from the reality?

In part, Zimbardo’s earliest statements about the experiment are to blame. In October, 1971, soon after the study’s completion—and before a single methodologically and analytically rigorous result had been published—Zimbardo was asked to testify before Congress about prison reform. His dramatic testimony, even as it clearly explained how the experiment worked, also allowed listeners to overlook how coercive the environment really was. He described the study as “an attempt to understand just what it means psychologically to be a prisoner or a prison guard.” But he also emphasized that the students in the study had been “the cream of the crop of this generation,” and said that the guards were given no specific instructions, and left free to make “up their own rules for maintaining law, order, and respect.” In explaining the results, he said that the “majority” of participants found themselves “no longer able to clearly differentiate between role-playing and self,” and that, in the six days the study took to unfold, “the experience of imprisonment undid, although temporarily, a lifetime of learning; human values were suspended, self-concepts were challenged, and the ugliest, most base, pathological side of human nature surfaced.” In describing another, related study and its implications for prison life, he said that “the mere act of assigning labels to people, calling some people prisoners and others guards, is sufficient to elicit pathological behavior.”

Zimbardo released video to NBC, which ran a feature on November 26, 1971. An article ran in the Times Magazine in April of 1973. In various ways, these accounts reiterated the claim that relatively small changes in circumstances could turn the best and brightest into monsters or depersonalized serfs. By the time Zimbardo published a formal paper about the study, in a 1973 issue of the International Journal of Criminology and Penology, a streamlined and unequivocal version of events had become entrenched in the national consciousness—so much so that a 1975 methodological critique fell largely on deaf ears.

Forty years later, Zimbardo still doesn’t shy away from popular attention. He served as a consultant on the new film, which follows his original study in detail, relying on direct transcripts from the experimental recordings and taking few dramatic liberties. In many ways, the film is critical of the study: Crudup plays Zimbardo as an overzealous researcher overstepping his bounds, trying to create a very specific outcome among the students he observes. The filmmakers even underscore the flimsiness of the experimental design, inserting characters who point out that Zimbardo is not a disinterested observer. They highlight a real-life conversation in which another psychologist asks Zimbardo whether he has an “independent variable.” In describing the study to his Stanford colleagues shortly after it ended, Zimbardo recalled that conversation: “To my surprise, I got really angry at him,” he said. “The security of my men and the stability of my prison was at stake, and I have to contend with this bleeding-heart, liberal, academic, effete dingdong whose only concern was for a ridiculous thing like an independent variable. The next thing he’d be asking me about was rehabilitation programs, the dummy! It wasn’t until sometime later that I realized how far into the experiment I was at that point.”

In a broad sense, the film reaffirms the opinion of John Mark, one of the guards, who, looking back, has said that Zimbardo’s interpretation of events was too shaped by his expectations to be meaningful: “He wanted to be able to say that college students, people from middle-class backgrounds … will turn on each other just because they’re given a role and given power. Based on my experience, and what I saw and what I felt, I think that was a real stretch.”

If the Stanford Prison Experiment had simulated a less brutal environment, would the prisoners and guards have acted differently? In December, 2001, two psychologists, Stephen Reicher and Alexander Haslam, tried to find out. They worked with the documentaries unit of the BBC to partially recreate Zimbardo’s setup over the course of an eight-day experiment. Their guards also had uniforms, and were given latitude to dole out rewards and punishments; their prisoners were placed in three-person cells that followed the layout of the Stanford County Jail almost exactly. The main difference was that, in this prison, the preset expectations were gone. The guards were asked to come up with rules prior to the prisoners’ arrival, and were told only to make the prison run smoothly. (The BBC Prison Study, as it came to be called, differed from the Stanford experiment in a few other ways, including prisoner dress; for a while, moreover, the prisoners were told that they could become guards through good behavior, although, on the third day, that offer was revoked, and the roles were made permanent.)

Within the first few days of the BBC study, it became clear that the guards weren’t cohering as a group. “Several guards were wary of assuming and exerting their authority,” the researchers wrote. The prisoners, on the other hand, developed a collective identity. In a change from the Stanford study, the psychologists asked each participant to complete a daily survey that measured the degree to which he felt solidarity with his group; it showed that, as the guards grew further apart, the prisoners were growing closer together. On the fourth day, three cellmates decided to test their luck. At lunchtime, one threw his plate down and demanded better food, another asked to smoke, and the third asked for medical attention for a blister on his foot. The guards became disorganized; one even offered the smoker a cigarette. Reicher and Haslam reported that, after the prisoners returned to their cells, they “literally danced with joy.” (“That was fucking sweet,” one prisoner remarked.) Soon, more prisoners began to challenge the guards. They acted out during roll call, complained about the food, and talked back. At the end of the sixth day, the three insubordinate cellmates broke out and occupied the guards’ quarters. “At this point,” the researchers wrote, “the guards’ regime was seen by all to be unworkable and at an end.”

Taken together, these two studies don’t suggest that we all have an innate capacity for tyranny or victimhood. Instead, they suggest that our behavior largely conforms to our preconceived expectations. All else being equal, we act as we think we’re expected to act—especially if that expectation comes from above. Suggest, as the Stanford setup did, that we should behave in stereotypical tough-guard fashion, and we strive to fit that role. Tell us, as the BBC experimenters did, that we shouldn’t give up hope of social mobility, and we act accordingly.

This understanding might seem to diminish the power of the Stanford Prison Experiment. But, in fact, it sharpens and clarifies the study’s meaning. Last weekend brought the tragic news of Kalief Browder’s suicide. At sixteen, Browder was arrested, in the Bronx, for allegedly stealing a backpack; after the arrest, he was imprisoned at Rikers for three years without trial. (Ultimately, the case against him was dismissed.) While at Rikers, Browder was the object of violence from both prisoners and guards, some of which was captured on video. It’s possible to think that prisons are the way they are because human nature tends toward the pathological. But the Stanford Prison Experiment suggests that extreme behavior flows from extreme institutions. Prisons aren’t blank slates. Guards do indeed self-select into their jobs, as Zimbardo’s students self-selected into a study of prison life. Like Zimbardo’s men, they are bombarded with expectations from the first and shaped by preëxisting norms and patterns of behavior. The lesson of Stanford isn’t that any random human being is capable of descending into sadism and tyranny. It’s that certain institutions and environments demand those behaviors—and, perhaps, can change them.

 

The Real Lesson of the Stanford Prison Experiment – The New Yorker.

 

The city’s narcotics cops are being told to stop arresting suspects over the age of 40 — a major strategy shift designed to target younger dealers, who are more likely to carry guns and use them, The Post has learned.

Top brass issued a directive that makes it all but impossible for cops to bust older drug suspects, in order to combat a spike in shootings — which are up 7 percent in 2015 compared with the same period last year and 12 percent over the last four weeks, police sources said.

The new policy was laid out in a May 14 memo obtained by The Post that scolded police bosses for busting people outside the 18-40 demographic — and demanded written explanations for arrests of midlife perps.

Division commanders who got that memo immediately ordered the rank and file to stop making collars in that age group and threatened officers with transfers and other discipline if they did not comply, according to multiple police sources.

The memo was signed by Assistant Chief Brian McCarthy, head of the Narcotics Division, who admitted at a meeting last week the directive came from higher up, said a source who was in attendance.

“A previous topic of discussion has been the need to target violent offenders who are 18 to 40 years of age. It has been well established that the individuals in this age demographic are responsible for the majority of violent crime,” McCarthy wrote. But, he added, a review of arrest records made by narcotics cops “revealed a lack of commitment to this effort.”

As a result, commanders will have to file weekly reports to McCarthy listing every arrest of a person over 40, and supervisors in the field will have to immediately notify their captain and get permission to bust any drug suspect that age.

Modal Trigger

The memo was signed by Assistant Chief Brian McCarthy

Commanding officers vented about the directive at a Friday meeting with McCarthy at One Police Plaza, according to sources.

“You’re telling us not to lock these people up,” one of the officers said. “However, the people over 40, they could be your burglars, they could be responsible for car break-ins, they could be responsible for robberies.”

McCarthy allegedly responded, “I’m glad you brought that up, but [the bosses] don’t give a s–t.”

A police source said, “This came from above him. It’s amazing, but if you’re over 40, go out and start selling drugs because you get a freebie.”

Narcotics cops have been scolded by their superiors for arresting older dealers, sources said. And a group of cops from The Bronx were even mocked about it at a recent CompStat meeting as they laid out photos of some recent arrests of perps who all appeared to be 40 or older.

“You should have brought those people to Lourdes instead of Central Booking,” an angry chief cracked, referring to the French town with a spring that Catholics believe has healing powers, a law enforcement source said.

A veteran source told The Post that a respected sergeant was threatened by the precinct’s commanding officer, Inspector Charles McEvoy, with a transfer after his team busted four older suspects.

“They were all over 40 years old. They were put through the system and went down to The Tombs. And [the sergeant] was pulled into a room. He was told if he does it again, he and his team will be launched out of Manhattan North. He’s doing what he’s supposed to do. That’s his job,” the source said.

“I’m blindsided by this. I don’t even know what to say. We’re letting criminals go. Crime is going to skyrocket.”

Sources said the rule makes it impossible for undercover cops to do their jobs.

“If the undercovers are out there and they are trying to buy from drug dealers, they have to have a conversation with them and find out how old they are. And if they’re over 40, they have to pass and move on,” the detective said.

NYPD spokesman Stephen Davis said that after “an analysis of the violence, we identified the core group of people committing the violence in certain areas was in the 18- to 35-year range . . . Since a fair amount of the violence is related to drug activity, our narcotics division was told to focus their efforts on those core areas and core groups.”

Davis insisted that cops “were never instructed to disregard crimes being committed by people of a certain age. No one was told that if you see someone committing a crime, and he happens to be 42 years old, that he gets a pass. That’s not the case.”

There have been 438 shooting victims this year compared to last, an 8.7 percent rise. Over the last 28 days, 126 people were shot compared to 101 for the same period in 2014, a 25 percent spike.

There have also been 378 shootings year to date, compared to 353 a year ago, a 7 percent rise. And over the past 28 days, there have been 102 shootings compared to 91 in 2014, a 12 percent rise.

Narcotics cops ordered to stop arresting suspects over 40 | New York Post.

 

(NaturalNews) According to the document you’re about to see, for the last eight years, government scientists have actively engineered viral vaccines designed to alter thoughts and beliefs by infecting the brain and suppressing genetic expression of neurological cells. Dispersal of these vaccines has been tested via high-altitude aerosolized sprays, highway vehicles, the water supply and even the food system.

As you’ll see in the document and video below, the vaccine was intended from the start to be deployed against civilian populations, and 600 strains of infectious viruses were tested on human subjects. One of the transmission vectors documented in the testing exploited an influenza strain to spread the mind-infecting virus as a pandemic.

The point of all this is to infect the minds of the population and transform people into what the government calls “normal.” From the government’s point of view, of course, “normal” means “obedient and mindless.”

This is all described in a video and a document that surfaced several years ago but which are only now beginning to connect the dots as the medical police state in America accelerates to insane levels of aggression against the population. See recent stories on medical kidnapping in Arkansas and CPS kidnapping of children in Arizona for starters.

Using aerosolized stealth vaccines as tools of behavioral control and mind alteration

This YouTube video, described as a “leaked Pentagon video,” features a Bill Gates-sounding scientist explaining in cold, calculating language how engineered vaccines can “eliminate behavior” that’s considered undesirable by the government.

Starting at the 3:00 mark, you can hear this scientist explaining how a vaccine can “turn a fanatic into a normal person.” A normal person, of course, means a person who is obedient to government authority.

Here’s a transcript of the presentation:

Scientist: And that would have the effect which is to essentially turn a fanatic into a normal person…

Audience: How would you suggest that this is going to be dispersed? Via aerosol?

Scientist: The present plan and the tests that we’ve done so far have used respiratory viruses such as flu or rhinoviruses, and we believe that’s a satisfactory way to get the exposure of the largest part of the population… and we’re quite confident this would be a very successful approach.

Audience: What’s the name of this proposal?

Scientist: The name is FUNVAX, the vaccine for religious fundamentalism. The proposal has just been submitted, and I think the data that I have shown you today would support the development of this project and we think it has great promise.

Watch the video here, which carries the US Dept. of Defense identifier of “DOD ID 149AZ2.”

Designed to infect brain cells and alter beliefs and behavior

This document at WantToKnow.info appears to explain the design and intent of the virus in a summary entitled, “Quarterly FunVax Review.”

The document says:

The objective of this phase of project ID 149AZ2 is to prepare a viral vector that will inhibit / decrease the expression of VMAT2 within a human population.

…the design allows the virus to infect the respiratory track where cytolytic infection occurs and then subsequent diffusion across the blood barrier to infect brain cells.

The document goes on to say that there will be “coordination between the research, clinical and manufacturing groups” taking place in 2007. This clearly spells out intent to take this project from the research phase to manufacturing and deployment.

You may wonder, therefore, against whom these weaponized mind control vaccines might be deployed, right? The answer is YOU.

Dispersal via air, water supply, highway vehicles and insects

According to the document linked above, the dispersal of the brain-modifying viral vaccine was tested in six different ways:

Six methods of … virus dispersal were tested – high altitude release, water supply release, insect transmission, diffusion by a ground level object such as a car, diffusion from a stationary object such as a bottle, and infection of food supply such as cattle or produce.

As you take in the paragraph you just read, consider that now, nearly eight years later, we are witnessing the release of genetically engineered mosquitoes combined with outbreaks of bizarre neurological conditions across U.S. schoolchildren and mysterious health conditions all over the world.

The “high-altitude release” of this mind-altering viral vaccine has no doubt already been achieved through the aerosolized spraying of cities in crisscross patterns of aerosolized dispersal at altitude, often labeled as “chemtrails.”

Suicide genes, field testing and future experiments

The same document cited above goes on to summarize a research group meeting that apparently took place on March 21st, 2007, in which the following topics were discussed:

• Proposal for a suicide gene
• Dispersal methods
• Testing efficiency in the field
• Inhibitors that may target a specific population
• Monkey knockdown progress
• Future experiments

Other directives in the document say things like:

“All 600 strains of VSV should be retested on human subjects…”

“Future experiments of VSV287 should allow the subject to breath in the virus rather than being injected with it.”

“The use of FunVax could see an immediate effect within the target zones… the results of mass inoculation should be proportionate to the rate of infection. Behavioral indicators … decrease in armed resistance… increase in communications that express discontent with religion or God.”

Fully intended to be deployed against civilian populations

It’s clear from the document that this mind-altering, brain-infecting vaccine was intended from the start to be deployed against civilian populations. In fact, the document discusses plans for covertly taking biological samples from dead civilians in order to determine the effectiveness of the aerosolized dispersal effort:

… a blood sample of militant casualties or deceased civilian would provide the most accurate estimate of the rate of vaccination… biological samples from living subjects may be covertly taken… the tests that should be repeated using the VSV287 are high atmospheric tests…

An airborne virus would be the preferred route of infection. A strain named VSV287 has been designed to spread via air… Only human trials can determine VSV287’s effect on religiosity and spirituality… high atmospheric dispersal or dispersal by a ground level moving object appears to be the most practical.

The government has a history of using aircraft to disperse vaccines

The air-dropping of vaccines onto large populations isn’t new, by the way. As I reported here on Natural News in 2012, the Texas government air-dropped 1.8 million rabies vaccines onto wild animal populations as part of a government-run scheme to vaccinate wildlife.

Yes, even wild coyotes and rabbits are not safe from the vaccine zealots. No animal on the planet is considered “safe” by health authorities unless it is first infected with a virus or two.

The Dept. of Defense plan is far more elaborate, however, using aerosolized dispersal with high-altitude aircraft or even dumping viral vaccines into the water supplies of large cities. Such an action would be considered an act of domestic terrorism if you or I did it, of course, but when the government proposes it, suddenly it’s okay.

Has a mind-altering vaccine already been released over U.S. cities?

All this brings up the obvious question: Has this mind-altering vaccine already been deployed over U.S. cities? It’s a legitimate question because the high-altitude deployment of this vaccine against civilian populations was clearly the intent of the program.

A mass “dumbing down” vaccine lobotomy would sure explain a lot of what’s going on in America these days, such as how certain people still haven’t figured out that every statement uttered by President Obama is a calculated lie. (I can’t wait to watch the upcoming theatrical comedy show called the “State of the Union Address.”)

I’ve also been wondering why we’re seeing a wholesale abandonment of morality and ethics across the western world these days, and it’s not an outlandish area of inquiry to wonder if entire cities of people have been intentionally exposed to a virus that infects their brains just as described by the scientist in the video above.

I know, it sounds like the actions of a Batman movie villain, but then again we already know the vaccine industry is largely staffed by mad scientists with villainous intent. Remember, this is the same group of disreputable scientists who knowingly committed scientific fraud by covering up the confession of a CDC scientist who admitted the agency manipulated data to eliminate any apparent link between vaccines and autism. It’s no stretch at all to realize these same people would gladly deploy vaccines to dumb people down if that made them more compliant and docile.

The greatest enemy of the vaccine industry is, of course, anyone who can still think for themselves.

We also know that vaccines are being deployed right now to covertly sterilize women using sterilization chemicals secretly mixed into the vaccines themselves.

We also know there’s still toxic mercury in flu shots, even though the establishment ridiculously claims flu shots are 100% safe to give to pregnant women, infants, toddlers, senior citizens and everyone else. This is an industry that actually seems to enjoy the power trip of causing widespread health harm, vaccine-induced seizures, comas, autism and even death. Deploying vaccines at high altitude to invisibly fall onto large cities where they are inhaled by millions of people is an almost erotic fantasy come true for these anti-human vaccine zealots who despise life and openly advocate human depopulation.

Can good nutrition protect you from aerosolized vaccine weapons of mass mental destruction?

When I look around America today and witness the total abandonment of rational thought, the criminality of the medical system, the corruption at every level of government and the twisted insanity infecting the minds of the masses, I can only wonder if the population has been covertly but deliberately exposed to something nefarious.

Perhaps some of us are immune — people like you and I — while others fall victim to the virus because they live in states of weakened immunity. Perhaps people who eat the most nutritious foods and superfoods have the best defenses against covert vaccine schemes and are therefore the only ones to emerge with their minds and awareness fully intact.

Perhaps we’re already five years into a massive war against human consciousness that’s being waged every day at every level, from the droning idiots on the cable news networks to the brain-destroying medications dosed out to nearly every person who steps foot in a doctor’s office. Combine aerosolized, weaponized vaccines with the mind-numbing effects of fluoride, TV sitcoms, chemical food additives and mass media social engineering and you end up with a nation of sleepwalking zombies who are only capable of obedience, not independent thought.

Through these aerosolized vaccines, in other words, the hilariously-depicted “zombie apocalypse” may already have begun. And perhaps the so-called “mindless masses” are actually just victims of a nefarious, government-run behavioral modification program designed to turn a human breath into an unintended vaccination event.

via 600 strains of an aerosolized thought control vaccine already tested on humans; deployed via air, food and water – NaturalNews.com.

OLATHE, Kan. – A woman convicted of murdering her husband in their Kansas home walked free Wednesday after serving just 9 years for the crime, reports CBS affiliate KCTV.

In 1982, Melinda Raisch’s husband, 25-year-old David Harmon, was bludgeoned to death in their bedroom. At the time, Raisch told police two intruders knocked her out and she woke up later to find her husband dead. Detectives never believed her story.

Even so, Raisch moved to Ohio, married again and started a family.

David and Melinda Harmon
CBS

Olathe detectives reopened the case 20 years later. This time, she changed her story, telling detectives there was just one intruder.

WATCH: 48 Hours: A Knock on the Door

They arrested her and her former boyfriend, Mark Mangelsdorf, a New York marketing executive who, at the time of the murder, was a college student in Olathe, Kansas.

According to the Kansas City Star, Raisch was convicted of first-degree murder, but prosecutors agreed to a deal where she could plead guilty to second-degree murder in exchange for her testimony against Mangelsdorf.

Mangelsdorf pleaded to second-degree murder and in 2006 both were sentenced to 10-20 years, reports the Star.

Raisch, who was freed Wednesday, will be under supervised parole in Ohio for ten more years.

 

Melinda Raisch, Kansas woman who murdered her husband David Harmon in 1982, freed after 9 years in prison – CBS News.

Now how isWayne County Assistant Prosecutor Teana Walsh had posted comments about this week’s unrest in Baltimore, which was sparked by the death of Freddie Gray after he was fatally injured in police custody, according to a screenshot of her page posted on MyFox Detroit.com.

She described “large swarms of people throwing bricks etc at police who are fleeing from their assaults” and then suggested using guns.

“Simple. Shoot em. Period. End of discussion,” Walsh posted.

via Detroit prosecutor resigns after saying Baltimore rioters should be shot | Reuters.

“Simple. Shoot em. Period. End of discussion,” Walsh posted.

via Detroit prosecutor resigns after saying Baltimore rioters should be shot | Reuters.

▶ Police Shoot Homeless Man Camping In Albuquerque (GRAPHIC VIDEO) – YouTube.

▶ FULL GRAPHIC VIDEO Of S.C Police Officer SHOOTING UNARMED Black Man 8 TIMES In The BACK!! – YouTube.

Just fucking watch the Attempted Murder of Francis Pusok ! Oh fuck that’s right he is a white man. Nothing here to see keep moving.

▶ Southern California Horse Pursuit (April 09, 2015) | KNBC – YouTube.

This is why zombies require headshots….. They have body armor

San Bernardino County Sheriffs beat a man that laid down and put his hands behind his back. The man kept his hands behind his back while being beaten.

EVERY COP THAT SHOWED UP WANTED SOME VACATION!
GOTTA GET A KICK IN! GOTTA GET SOME PAID ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE!!

THE ONLY GOOD COPS (IN THE ENTIRE FUCKING USA) WILL BE HOLDING SIGNS OUTSIDE OF THE SAN BERNARDINO STATION DEMANDING ARRESTS AND CONVICTION OF OFFICERS THAT HAVE DISGRACED THEIR PROFESSION. Just go count them….. Oh I will for you ZERO.

These are not rogue cops.

These are what every fucking one of them are like.

Are you going to go quietly?

Video shows deputies beating man who fled on horse – CNN.com.

Man is sent to jail woman gets a ticket……

Sex in broad daylight: Shoppers get an eye full – 23ABC News.

If it was a male teacher and a female student it would have been 7 years!

Judge Gives Teacher Who Had Sex With Student 30 Days, Calls Her ‘Dangling Candy’.

Forbidden Bookshelf | Feed Your Need To Read.

 

Here are the 5 states that let you carry a concealed gun without a permit – Vox.

 

Sabrina Rubin Erdely, the author of a now-discredited article in Rolling Stone magazine about a rape at a University of Virginia fraternity, issued this statement:

“The past few months, since my Rolling Stone article “A Rape on Campus” was first called into question, have been among the most painful of my life. Reading the Columbia account of the mistakes and misjudgments in my reporting was a brutal and humbling experience. I want to offer my deepest apologies: to Rolling Stone’s readers, to my Rolling Stone editors and colleagues,to theU.V.A. community, and to any victims of sexual assault who may feel fearful as a result of my article.

“Over my 20 years of working as an investigative journalist — including at Rolling Stone, a magazine I grew up loving and am honored to work for — I have often dealt with sensitive topics and sources. In writing each of these stories I must weigh my compassion against my journalistic duty to find the truth. However, in the case of Jackie and her account of her traumatic rape, I did not go far enough to verify her story. I allowed my concern for Jackie’s well-being, my fear of re-traumatizing her, and my confidence in her credibility to take the place of more questioning and more facts. These are mistakes I will not make again.

“Reporting on rape has unique challenges, but the journalist still has the responsibility to get it right. I hope that my mistakes in reporting this story do not silence the voices of victims that need to be heard.”

Statement From University of Virginia President

Teresa A. Sullivan, the president of the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, issued a statement late Sunday.

“Rolling Stone’s story, ‘A Rape on Campus,’ did nothing to combat sexual violence, and it damaged serious efforts to address the issue. Irresponsible journalism unjustly damaged the reputations of many innocent individuals and the University of Virginia. Rolling Stone falsely accused some University of Virginia students of heinous, criminal acts, and falsely depicted others as indifferent to the suffering of their classmate. The story portrayed university staff members as manipulative and callous toward victims of sexual assault. Such false depictions reinforce the reluctance sexual assault victims already feel about reporting their experience, lest they be doubted or ignored.

“The Charlottesville Police Department investigation confirms that far from being callous, our staff members are diligent and devoted in supporting and caring for students. I offer our community’s genuine gratitude for their devotion and perseverance in their service.

“Sexual violence is a serious issue for our society, and it requires the focus and attention of all in our communities. Long before Rolling Stone published its article, the University of Virginia was working to confront sexual violence. And we will continue to implement substantive reforms to improve culture, prevent violence and respond to acts of violence when they occur. Our highest priority is to ensure the safety of our students so they can learn and achieve their personal potential in an environment of trust and security. We will continue to work tirelessly in pursuit of that goal.”

 

Statement From Writer of Rolling Stone Rape Article, Sabrina Erdely – NYTimes.com.

Sean Bell

The 2006 shooting of 23-year-old Sean Bell raised questions in New York City about the NYPD’s use of excessive force. On what would have been his wedding day, Bell was shot and killed by police in a hail of 50 bullets outside a strip club in Queens. Officers said they thought the victim and his friends, who were celebrating Bell’s bachelor party, were planning on retrieving a gun from their vehicle when they opened fire. After months of protests around the city, Officers Michael Oliver, Gescard Isnora and Marc Cooper were acquitted in 2008.

via Henry Solis, LA Cop, Suspected Of Killing Man During Off-Duty Fight.

David London

Security cameras in a Manhattan apartment building recorded NYPD officer David London hitting Iraq war veteran Walter Harvin almost 20 times with a baton even after he had handcuffed him. The incident began when Harvin entered the building without a key and refused to identify himself to London. Footage shows Harvin shoved London, but the cop lied to investigators by claiming that he’d been punched before retaliating with his baton. A jury acquitted London of assault and making false statements in 2010.

via Henry Solis, LA Cop, Suspected Of Killing Man During Off-Duty Fight.

Danziger Bridge Shootings

The trial is underway for four New Orleans police officers accused of killing two people and wounding four others in the shooting on the Danziger Bridge in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The suspects, pictured left to right, are Robert Faulcon Jr., Robert Gisevius Jr., Kenneth Bowen, and Anthony Villavaso II.

via Henry Solis, LA Cop, Suspected Of Killing Man During Off-Duty Fight.

Jon Burge

In this May 24, 2010 file photo, former Chicago Police commander Jon Burge departs the federal building in Chicago. Burge, whose name has become synonymous with police brutality and abuse of power in Chicago, was convicted in 2010 of perjury and obstruction of justice for lying in a civil suit when he said he’d never witnessed or participated in the torture of suspects.

via Henry Solis, LA Cop, Suspected Of Killing Man During Off-Duty Fight.