Archive for November, 2012

Where is Amanda? 

Looks like she has more fans than just me.  The folks over at DD fixed her photo to show their idea of her potential.  She is a looker.  And at a young tender age she saw a way out of a situation without knowing the full ramifications.  If you are out there I generally ignore most comments but if you put I AM AMANDA in the comment I will reply to you sweetheart.

Amanda Rose Owens

via DonkDown • Can we get Amanda Owens on DD Radio please? Or at least make her an honorary mod? : Shooting Off.

More of the digital age changing the business model.

RIAA got to hell.

Sorry they just have not adapted.

Now for the colleges.

Give the class for free.

So how do you make any money?

Charge to grade the tests and grant credits.

Done. Dumb-assess.

THEN

There would be competing “teachers” and “programs”  that would prepare “students” for the tests just like there are for state tests for the Bar, medical licenses, engineering licenses, and the free market will drive the cost of these serveces to what they are actually worth.

 

Oh back to the RIAA Charge for product endorsements or pay artists just like Olympic athletes for sponsorship promotions.  Oh yea but then the money actually goes to the artist no the “moguls” (printing press pigs)

 

Colleges Turn to Crowd-Sourcing Courses – NYTimes.com.

Page 2: Medical Mystery: Body’s Own ‘Valium’ Leads to Extreme Sleepiness – ABC News.

New York

At Yale University, you can be prevented from putting an F. Scott Fitzgerald quote on your T-shirt. At Tufts, you can be censured for quoting certain passages from the Quran. Welcome to the most authoritarian institution in America: the modern university—”a bizarre, parallel dimension,” as Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, calls it.

Mr. Lukianoff, a 38-year-old Stanford Law grad, has spent the past decade fighting free-speech battles on college campuses. The latest was last week at Fordham University, where President Joseph McShane scolded College Republicans for the sin of inviting Ann Coulter to speak.

Related Video

Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, on the battle for free speech on college campuses. Photo: Getty Images

“To say that I am disappointed with the judgment and maturity of the College Republicans . . . would be a tremendous understatement,” Mr. McShane said in a Nov. 9 statement condemning the club’s invitation to the caustic conservative pundit. He vowed to “hold out great contempt for anyone who would intentionally inflict pain on another human being because of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or creed.”

To be clear, Mr. McShane didn’t block Ms. Coulter’s speech, but he said that her presence would serve as a “test” for Fordham. A day later, the students disinvited Ms. Coulter. Mr. McShane then praised them for having taken “responsibility for their decisions” and expressing “their regrets sincerely and eloquently.”

Mr. Lukianoff says that the Fordham-Coulter affair took campus censorship to a new level: “This was the longest, strongest condemnation of a speaker that I’ve ever seen in which a university president also tried to claim that he was defending freedom of speech.”

I caught up with Mr. Lukianoff at New York University in downtown Manhattan, where he was once targeted by the same speech restrictions that he has built a career exposing. Six years ago, a student group at the university invited him to participate in a panel discussion about the Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad that had sparked violent rioting by Muslims across the world.

When Muslim students protested the event, NYU threatened to close the panel to the public if the offending cartoons were displayed. The discussion went on—without the cartoons. Instead, the student hosts displayed a blank easel, registering their own protest.

“The people who believe that colleges and universities are places where we want less freedom of speech have won,” Mr. Lukianoff says. “If anything, there should be even greater freedom of speech on college campuses. But now things have been turned around to give campus communities the expectation that if someone’s feelings are hurt by something that is said, the university will protect that person. As soon as you allow something as vague as Big Brother protecting your feelings, anything and everything can be punished.”

You might say Greg Lukianoff was born to fight college censorship. With his unruly red hair and a voice given to booming, he certainly looks and sounds the part. His ethnically Irish, British-born mother moved to America during the 1960s British-nanny fad, while his Russian father came from Yugoslavia to study at the University of Wisconsin. Russian history, Mr. Lukianoff says, “taught me about the worst things that can happen with good intentions.”

Growing up in an immigrant neighborhood in Danbury, Conn., sharpened his views. When “you had so many people from so many different backgrounds, free speech made intuitive sense,” Mr. Lukianoff recalls. “In every genuinely diverse community I’ve ever lived in, freedom of speech had to be the rule. . . . I find it deeply ironic that on college campuses diversity is used as an argument against unbridled freedom of speech.”

After graduating from Stanford, where he specialized in First Amendment law, he joined the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, an organization co-founded in 1999 by civil-rights lawyer Harvey Silverglate and Alan Charles Kors, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania, to counter the growing but often hidden threats to free speech in academia. FIRE’s tactics include waging publicity campaigns intended to embarrass college administrators into dropping speech-related disciplinary charges against individual students, or reversing speech-restricting policies. When that fails, FIRE often takes its cases to court, where it tends to prevail.

Zina Saunders

In his new book, “Unlearning Liberty,” Mr. Lukianoff notes that baby-boom Americans who remember the student protests of the 1960s tend to assume that U.S. colleges are still some of the freest places on earth. But that idealized university no longer exists. It was wiped out in the 1990s by administrators, diversity hustlers and liability-management professionals, who were often abetted by professors committed to political agendas.

“What’s disappointing and rightfully scorned,” Mr. Lukianoff says, “is that in some cases the very professors who were benefiting from the free-speech movement turned around to advocate speech codes and speech zones in the 1980s and ’90s.”

Today, university bureaucrats suppress debate with anti-harassment policies that function as de facto speech codes. FIRE maintains a database of such policies on its website, and Mr. Lukianoff’s book offers an eye-opening sampling. What they share is a view of “harassment” so broad and so removed from its legal definition that, Mr. Lukianoff says, “literally every student on campus is already guilty.”

At Western Michigan University, it is considered harassment to hold a “condescending sex-based attitude.” That just about sums up the line “I think of all Harvard men as sissies” (from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1920 novel “This Side of Paradise”), a quote that was banned at Yale when students put it on a T-shirt. Tufts University in Boston proscribes the holding of “sexist attitudes,” and a student newspaper there was found guilty of harassment in 2007 for printing violent passages from the Quran and facts about the status of women in Saudi Arabia during the school’s “Islamic Awareness Week.”

At California State University in Chico, it was prohibited until recently to engage in “continual use of generic masculine terms such as to refer to people of both sexes or references to both men and women as necessarily heterosexual.” Luckily, there is no need to try to figure out what the school was talking about—the prohibition was removed earlier this year after FIRE named it as one of its two “Speech Codes of the Year” in 2011.

At Northeastern University, where I went to law school, it is a violation of the Internet-usage policy to transmit any message “which in the sole judgment” of administrators is “annoying.”

Conservatives and libertarians are especially vulnerable to such charges of harassment. Even though Mr. Lukianoff’s efforts might aid those censorship victims, he hardly counts himself as one of them: He says that he is a lifelong Democrat and a “passionate believer” in gay marriage and abortion rights. And free speech. “If you’re going to get in trouble for an opinion on campus, it’s more likely for a socially conservative opinion.”

Consider the two students at Colorado College who were punished in 2008 for satirizing a gender-studies newsletter. The newsletter had included boisterous references to “male castration,” “feminist porn” and other unprintable matters. The satire, published by the “Coalition of Some Dudes,” tamely discussed “chainsaw etiquette” (“your chainsaw is not an indoor toy”) and offered quotations from Teddy Roosevelt and menshealth.com. The college found the student satirists guilty of “the juxtaposition of weaponry and sexuality.”

“Even when we win our cases,” says Mr. Lukianoff, “the universities almost never apologize to the students they hurt or the faculty they drag through the mud.” Brandeis University has yet to withdraw a 2007 finding of racial harassment against Prof. Donald Hindley for explaining the origins of “wetback” in a Latin-American Studies course. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis apologized to a janitor found guilty of harassment—for reading a book celebrating the defeat of the Ku Klux Klan in the presence of two black colleagues—but only after protests by FIRE and an op-ed in these pages by Dorothy Rabinowitz.

What motivates college administrators to act so viciously? “It’s both self-interest and ideological commitment,” Mr. Lukianoff says. On the ideological front, “it’s almost like you flip a switch, and these administrators, who talk so much about treating every student with dignity and compassion, suddenly come to see one student as a caricature of societal evil.”

Administrative self-interest is also at work. “There’s been this huge expansion in the bureaucratic class at universities,” Mr. Lukianoff explains. “They passed the number of people involved in instruction sometime around 2006. So you get this ever-renewing crop of administrators, and their jobs aren’t instruction but to police student behavior. In the worst cases, they see it as their duty to intervene on students’ deepest beliefs.”

Consider the University of Delaware, which in fall 2007 instituted an ideological orientation for freshmen. The “treatment,” as the administrators called it, included personal interviews that probed students’ private lives with such questions as: “When did you discover your sexual identity?” Students were taught in group sessions that the term racist “applies to all white people” while “people of color cannot be racists.” Once FIRE spotlighted it, the university dismantled the program.

Yet in March 2012, Kathleen Kerr, the architect of the Delaware program, was elected vice president of the American College Personnel Association, the professional group of university administrators.

A 2010 survey by the American Association of Colleges and Universities found that of 24,000 college students, only 35.6% strongly agreed that “it is safe to hold unpopular views on campus.” When the question was asked of 9,000 campus professionals—who are more familiar with the enforcement end of the censorship rules—only 18.8% strongly agreed.

Mr. Lukianoff thinks all of this should alarm students, parents and alumni enough to demand change: “If just a handful more students came in knowing what administrators are doing at orientation programs, with harassment codes, or free-speech zones—if students knew this was wrong—we could really change things.”

The trouble is that students are usually intimidated into submission. “The startling majority of students don’t bother. They’re too concerned about their careers, too concerned about their grades, to bother fighting back,” he says. Parents and alumni dismiss free-speech restrictions as something that only happens to conservatives, or that will never affect their own children.

“I make the point that this is happening, and even if it’s happening to people you don’t like, it’s a fundamental violation of what the university means,” says Mr. Lukianoff. “Free speech is about protecting minority rights. Free speech is about admitting you don’t know everything. Free speech is about protecting oddballs. It means protecting dissenters.”

It even means letting Ann Coulter speak.

Mr. Ahmari is an assistant books editor at the Journal.

A version of this article appeared November 17, 2012, on page A15 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: How Free Speech Died on Campus.

 

Top Ten Benefits of Zinc
By Charles Poliquin 2/9/2012 1:05:04 PM

Improve all aspects of your health and well-being by making sure you get enough zinc in your diet. Many people know about zinc for its immune boosting properties, but this mineral is actually a wonder of health benefits. Researchers write that “zinc is such a critical element in human health that even a small deficiency is a disaster.”

Zinc is so important because it is found in every tissue in the body and is directly involved in cell division. It is a powerful antioxidant, helping to prevent cancer, but zinc also is directly involved in proper endocrine function and the maintenance of ideal hormone levels.

Zinc deficiency makes both men and women infertile and causes low libido.

 

Additionally, adequate zinc is necessary for optimal physical performance, energy levels, and body composition. Zinc affects protein synthesis and is required for proper function of red and white blood cells. It is highly concentrated in our bones, the pancreas, kidneys, liver, and retina.

Low zinc also exacerbates the effects of stress on the body and accelerates aging.

This article will give you the top ten reasons why you should attend to your zinc levels and ensure your loved ones are doing so as well. Be aware that zinc deficiency is not only prevalent in malnourished individuals or developing countries. Rather, it is widespread in the U.S. and the UK, and it is particularly common in areas where the population eats a large amount of cereal and grain proteins. Low zinc is common in men, women, and children, and I’ve found that over 90 percent of my clients and athletes are zinc deficient.

Groups At Greatest Risk of Low Zinc

Zinc deficiency occurs from not eating enough zinc-rich foods. Zinc is found in large concentrations in meat, some seafood—

oysters contain the largest concentration of all known foods—

and dairy. Whole grains and legumes contain zinc, but it is bound to phytates in these plant-based foods, making the zinc inaccessible by the body. Vegetarians are at greatest risk of zinc deficiency, but alcoholics and people with digestive issues and poor stomach acid are also highly susceptible. Taking medications may produce zinc deficiency and low levels of almost all essential nutrients. Women on the birth control pill or on hormone replacement therapy are at greater risk of deficiency.

Symptoms of Zinc Deficiency

Low zinc will produce an altered sense of taste leading to cravings of saltier, sweeter food. Deficiency can also be indicated by diarrhea, low energy, chronic fatigue, infertility, poor immunity, bad memory,  inability to focus, ADD symptoms, slow wound healing, nerve dysfunction, and ringing in the ears.

Take note that symptoms may be present, but because they are so diverse and associated with other health conditions, it’s often hard to make the link to zinc deficiency without a test. A guide is provided at the end of this article on how to test your zinc level.

#1 Improve Athletic Performance and Strength
Adequate zinc directly affects athletic performance and strength development from training because it plays a primary role in anabolic hormone production.  Research shows having ample zinc available in the body allows for a more robust release of the three most important anabolic hormones, testosterone, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Without these, you’ll miss out on muscle and strength development from your hard work in the gym.

A recent study in the journal Biological Trace Element Research highlights the boost that raising zinc levels can give to testosterone production following exercise. Researchers found that giving trained athletes a zinc supplement for four weeks prior to an exhaustive exercise test resulted in a greater post-workout testosterone response than a placebo.

Taking zinc produced higher testosterone levels in the athletes than taking a selenium supplement (a powerful antioxidant that minimizes oxidative stress in the testis). Researchers note that zinc enhances the conversion rate of androstenedione to testosterone, and that paired with high-intensity exercise, it allows the body to produce testosterone at an even higher rate.

Male and female athletes will benefit from adequate zinc since this mineral ensures healthy release of growth hormone and IGF-1, which are essential for performance and muscle development in both sexes. Plus, the boost to testosterone post-workout can improve strength gains recovery in men. And, as you’ll see below, having enough zinc will give you more energy and improve metabolism.

#2 Support Male Reproductive Health and Fertility

Zinc is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, and the cells of the male prostate require a very high concentration of zinc to work optimally. Low zinc in men impairs testosterone production, puts them at risk for developing prostate cancer, and causes infertility. Inadequate zinc has also been linked to low libido.

One recent study of 88 men aged 40 to 60 years showed that those with normal testosterone levels had significantly higher zinc compared to those with low testosterone levels. Low zinc was directly correlated with low testosterone levels, which put the men at greater risk of symptoms of male menopause.

Just as important, zinc is used to produce enzymes that initiate cell division,

but the male prostate tissue requires ten times more zinc than other cells in the body to stay healthy. Adequate zinc level in the prostate protects the cells from damage, inflammation, and cancer development. Also, once the prostate cells are damaged and become cancerous, they lack the ability to accumulate zinc, leading to greater propagation of cancer cells that produce to tumors.
Giving a large dose of therapeutic zinc to rats with prostate cancer halted cancer cell proliferation and helped the rats maintain body weight, which is an indicator of better overall health and homeostasis. There was reduced evidence of biomarkers that indicate oxidative stress and inflammation in the prostate from the zinc supplement. Overall enzyme levels were better.

In contrast, a placebo group had a rapid increase in cancer cell growth and decrease in body weight. There was also a 50 percent increase in DNA damage and inflammation during the study period, indicating a progressively diseased prostate cancer state.

Researchers write that zinc is a “promising anti-cancer treatment” and that regular supplementation when men are healthy with no evidence of cancer is the best prevention. They also suggest zinc can prevent related cancers such as ovarian, breast, and colorectal.

#3 Support Female Reproductive Health and Fertility
In women, zinc is involved in the growth process of the oocyte or egg. If women are zinc deficient, the egg won’t mature properly and ovulation will be impeded, causing infertility. Adequate zinc allows women to use estrogen and progesterone efficiently, supporting reproductive health and ensuring that estrogen does what it’s supposed to do in the body. When estrogen levels become too high, or are inefficiently metabolized they can cause poor reproductive health and breast cancer.

#4 Prevent Cancer and Boost Immune Function
Ananda Prasad, a leading researcher in the field of zinc and health, notes that simply ensuring our zinc levels are adequate can help cure a number of the most severe health problems, especially cancer and poor immune function. Along with prostate cancer, low zinc plays a role in the development of most cancers since it is instrumental in healthy cell proliferation. Recent evidence links zinc deficiency to cancers of the breast, colon, ovaries, lungs, skin, and leukemia.

Zinc deficiency profoundly affects the immune system because low zinc produces a direct and rapid decline in T cell function. T cells elevate the body’s immune system when viruses, bacteria, or challenges to health arise. Older people are at greater risk of zinc deficiency, which is not thought to be solely due to poor dietary intake. There’s evidence that a need for more zinc may increase with age to counter inflammation, support the immune system, and ensure healthy cell function.

#5 Improve Cardiovascular Health
Zinc is vital to maintain the health of cardiovascular cells and the endothelium. The endothelium is the thin layer of cells that lines the blood vessels and plays a major role in circulation. Low zinc can cause a deficiency in the endothelial barrier, which  leads to high cholesterol buildup and inflammation. Cholesterol and inflammation increase your risk of heart disease.

Studies show that poor zinc status can amplify the negative cardiovascular effects of a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet, whereas an adequate zinc intake will have a protective effect and inhibit the progression of heart disease. The elderly population is especially susceptible to the buildup of inflammatory markers including C-reactive proteins and cytokines, which have been called “slow, silent killers.”

#6 Become More Sensitive to Insulin and Prevent Diabetes
Zinc is needed for the healthy function of most hormones, including insulin. Adequate zinc plays at least three roles in insulin health. First, zinc binds to insulin so that insulin is adequately stored in the pancreas and released when glucose enters the blood stream.

Second, zinc improves cell health, making up a component of the enzymes necessary for insulin to bind to cells so that glucose can enter and be used as fuel. The process of insulin binding to the cell is what is referred to with the term “insulin sensitivity” and means that the cell is receptive to insulin. Once insulin binds to the cell, it “opens the door” so that the glucose can enter. If the cell is resistant to insulin, glucose will stay in the blood stream, cause high blood sugar, and ultimately lead to fat gain. When zinc concentration falls, there is a reduction in insulin secretion and peripheral insulin sensitivity, which if persistent, will lead to diabetes

Third, zinc has anti-inflammatory effects as mentioned in #5 via its role in abolishing inflammatory markers such as C-reactive proteins. Zinc also helps get rid of substances that cause inflammation in cells, helping to preserve cell health and insulin sensitivity.

A recent study of Spanish school children found a direct relationship between low zinc levels, greater body fat content, and insulin resistance. The children who were classified as zinc deficient had poorer insulin sensitivity and greater glucose intolerance (a related measurement of persistent blood sugar levels) than those whose level was adequate.

#7 Get The Super Antioxidant Effects of Zinc
Zinc is an excellent antioxidant. The purpose of an antioxidant is to get rid of free radicals that cause damage to cells in the body by bonding with them and neutralizing them. Zinc is particularly good at countering the damaging effect of high iron. Zinc also targets free radicals that cause inflammation and is especially effective at detoxifying heavy metals from the brain.

#8 Detoxify The Brain of Heavy Metals and Prevent Alzheimer’s
The super antioxidant effects of zinc allow it to efficiently remove toxins from the body and keep them from building up in tissue and causing damage. The progression of neurodegeneration and Alzheimer’s disease is accelerated by heavy metal buildup in the brain. Zinc can help get rid of those toxins, and it also helps maintain cellular homeostasis of brain cells.

#9 Boost Brain Function and Treat ADHD

Zinc plays an essential role in neurotransmitter function and helps maintain brain structure and health. It is necessary in the metabolism of melatonin, which regulates dopamine. Also, zinc is part of an enzyme that is necessary for the anabolism of fatty acids in the brain membrane. This is very important because a key part of supporting brain health and function is to ensure the membrane gets the nutrients it needs.

A new study on rats tested the effect of giving supplemental zinc to pregnant females during gestation and lactation and found better spatial memory and overall cognitive development in the offspring. A large zinc dose produced the best results. Human studies are limited, but data on how zinc can treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) indicate its importance.

Zinc is a commonly ignored mineral for treating ADHD. Studies show children with ADHD tend to have lower zinc than healthy children. Even more promising, one study of 400 children with diagnosed ADHD found that taking 150 mg/d of zinc sulfate improved impaired social behavior and made subjects less hyperactive and impulsive than a placebo. Subjects that had higher body mass index and lower fatty acid level had more dramatic improvements in socialization and hyperactivity measures from taking zinc.

#10 Elevate Mood and Avoid Depression
The  exact relationship between zinc deficiency and depression is unknown, however it surely has to do with the role of zinc in neurotransmitter and hormone production. Dopamine production, which is partly regulated by zinc status, is a chemical that boosts energy, mood, and reward-driven learning. Poor insulin health or low testosterone levels can lead to health problems that increase rates of depression and low energy. Throw in the antioxidant power of zinc and its ability to get rid of inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor (causes cell damage), and it is reasonable to ensure zinc intake is adequate when treating depression.

A new study in the Journal of Affective Disorders showed that zinc deficiency may affect depression in women more than men. Women in this study who were already using antidepressants and had low zinc levels had a five times greater risk of ongoing depression. It’s thought that the gender-based relationship between low zinc and depression is related to how zinc influences energy levels and production of the hormone estrogen.

In women, estrogen is involved in serotonin production—the neurotransmitter that makes people feel good—and zinc supplementation can increase the density of serotonin receptors in the brain. Have you picked up on the theme that zinc plays multiple roles in the body, affecting numerous chemical messengers that play complex, essential, interconnected parts in the body?

How To Test Zinc Level
Before you start popping zinc at random, take note that there is an upper limit to dietary zinc. Zinc toxicity has produced poor immune health and infertility, just as low zinc compromises the immune system. Scientists suggest you perform a zinc test to measure your level and then supplement accordingly. Once you start taking zinc, your levels will rise and you should do another test six to eight weeks later for best results.

The simplest way to test for zinc is a taste test that works because we know that taste and smell are dependent on there being adequate zinc in the body. To do this test, get zinc sulfate and put about 1-2 teaspoons in a cup and sip it, holding it in the mouth. If it tastes just like water, you are very zinc deficient. If you taste something slightly metallic, you are moderately zinc deficient. If it tastes disgusting—strongly metallic and unpleasant—your levels are probably adequate. This test is subject to individual taste perception and it is not 100 percent valid, but it is a good place to start.

Other test options are a serum zinc test, but there are factors that can cause inaccuracies such as fluctuations from meals, stress, diurnal variations, and complications from other nutrient deficiencies. A plasma zinc test is another option and it will pick up severe zinc deficiencies, but it won’t indicate a more moderate deficiency. It should not be relied on because even a moderate deficiency will negatively influence health.

References:

Neek, L., Gaeini, A., Choobineh, S. Effect of Zinc and Selenium Supplementation on Serum Testosterone and Plasma Lactate in Cyclist After an Exhaustive Exercise Bout. Biological Trace Element Research. 9 July 2011. Published Ahead of Print.

Chang, C., Choi, J., Kim, H., Park, S. Correlation Between Serum Testosterone Level and Concentrations of Copper and Zinc in Hair Tissue. Biological Trace Element Research. 14 June 2011. Published Ahead of Print.

Maseregian, N., Hall, S., et al. Low Dietary or Supplemental Zinc is Associated with Depression Symptoms Among Women, But not Men, in a Population-Based Epidemiological Survey. Journal of Affective Disorders. October 2011. Published Ahead of Print.

Piechal, A, Blecharz-Klin, K., et al. Maternal Zinc Supplementation Improves Spatial Memory in Rat Pups. Biological Trace elements Research. January 2012. Published Ahead of Print.

Banudevi, S., Elumalai, P., et al. Chemopreventive Effects of Zinc on Prostate Carcinogenesis Induced by N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea and Testosterone in Adult Male Spargue-Dawley Rats. Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology. 201. 137(4), 677-86.

Gumulec, J., Masarik, M., et al. Molecular Mechanisms of Zinc in Prostate Cancer. Klinical Onkology. 2011. 24(4), 249-255.

Ortega, R., Rodriguez, E., et al. Poor Zinc Status is Associated with Increased Risk of Insulin Resistance in Spanish Children. British Journal of Nutrition. 2012. 107, 398-404.

Abdelhalim, Mohamed. Atherosclerosis Can be Strongly Influenced by Iron and Zinc Overload or Deficiency in the Lung and Kidney Tissues of Rabbits. African Journal of Microbiology Research. 2010. 4(24), 2748-2753.

Chasapis, C., Loutsidou, A., et al. Zinc and Human Health: An Update. Archives of Toxicology. November 2011. Published Ahead of Print.

Tian, X., Diaz, F. Zinc Depletion Causes Multiple Defects in Ovarian Function During the Periovulatory Period in Mice. Endocrinology. 2012. 153(2), 873-886.

Wong, C., Ho, E. Zinc and its Role in Age-Related Inflammation and Immune Dysfunction. Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. 2012. 56, 77-87.

Shinjini, B., Taneja, S. Zinc and Cognitive Development. British Journal of Nutrition. 2001. 85(Suppl 2), 139-145.

Maylor, E., Simpson, E., et al. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Cognitive Function in Healthy Middle-Aged and Older Adults: the ZENITH Study. British Journal of Nutrition. 2006. 96, 752-760.

Prasad, Ananda. Zinc Deficiency. British Medical Journal. 2003. 326, 409-410.   Yary, T., Aazami, S. Dietary Intake of Zinc was Inversely Associated with Depression. Biological Trace Element Research. September 2011. Published Ahead of Print.

Dodig-Cukovic, K., Dovhang, J., et al. The Role of Zinc in the Treatment of Hyperactivity Disorder in Children. Acta Medica Croatica. 2009. 63(4), 307313.

Bilici, M., Yildrim, F., et al. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Zinc Sulfate in the Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Progress in Neuropsychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 2004. 28(1), 181-190.

 

 

Oxytocin keeps attached men away from hot women

By MyHealthNewsDaily Staff
MyHealthNewsDaily

The “love hormone” oxytocin may help maintain romantic relationships by prompting men to keep their distance from attractive women, a new study from Germany suggests.

In the study, men in monogamous relationships who were given an oxytocin nasal spray stayed about four to six inches farther away from an attractive, woman they didn’t know, compared with men in monogamous relationships who received a placebo.

The oxytocin spray had no effect on the distance that single men chose to keep between themselves and the attractive woman.

The results suggest the hormone promotes fidelity in humans, said study researcher Dr. René Hurle­mann, of the University of Bonn. The findings agree with previous research conducted on prairie voles, which suggested the hormone plays a role in pair-bonding.

In humans, oxytocin has been found to promote bonding between parents and children, increase trust, and reduce conflict between couples. And earlier this year, a study found that couples with high levels of oxytocin in the early stages of a relationship were more likely to be together six months later than couples with lower levels of the hormone.

But until now, there has been no evidence that a dose of oxytocin given after a couple gets together contributes to the maintenance of the relationship, the researchers said.

The study involved 57 heterosexual males, about half of whom were in monogamous relationships. After receiving either a dose of oxytocin or placebo, participants were introduced to a female experimenter who they later described as “attractive.”

During the encounter, the experimenter moved towards or away from the men, and they were asked to indicate when she was at an “ideal distance” away, as well as when she moved to a distance that felt “slightly uncomfortable.”

The effect of oxytocin on the attached men was the same regardless of whether the female experimenter maintained eye contact, or averted her gaze. Oxytocin also had no effect on the men’s attitude toward the female experimenter — whether men received the oxytocin or the placebo, they rated her as being equally attractive.

In a separate experiment, the researchers found oxytocin had no effect on the distance men kept between themselves and a male experimenter.

Future studies are needed to determine exactly how oxytocin might act on the brain to affect behavior, the researchers said.

The study will be published Nov. 14) 2012  in The Journal of Neuroscience.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Oxytocin —the so-called “love hormone” — is being increasingly shown to trigger a wide variety of physical and psychological effects in both women and men.

The hormone’s influence on our behavior and physiology originates in the brain, where it’s produced by the by a structure called the hypothalamus, and then transfers to the pituitary gland which releases into the bloodstream.. Like antennas picking up a signal, oxytocin receptors are found on cells throughout the body. Levels of the hormone tend to be higher during both stressful and socially bonding experiences, according to the American Psychological Association.

“It’s like a hormone of attachment, you might say,” said Carol Rinkleib Ellison, a clinical psychologist in private practice in Loomis, California and former assistant clinical psychiatry professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “It creates feelings of calm and closeness.”

Thought scientists have long  known about oxytocin’s rolein breastfeeding and childbirth, “We’re just learning more about it now,” Ellison said.

A stream of studies in the last decade have focused on oxytocin’s effects on body and mind. Here’s a look at what we’ve learned.

 

Oxytocin promotes attachment

Pregnant women with higher levels of oxytocin during their first trimester bonded more strongly with their babies after they were born, according to a 2007 study in the journal Psychological Science. And compared with other women, women with higher levels throughout their pregnancy and in the first month after birth reported engaging in more behaviors — such as singing, feeding and bathing their infants in specific ways — that promoted an exclusive relationship between the two, the study found.

 

Oxytocin solidifies relationships

Comparing urine levels of oxytocin and a related hormone called vasopressin in biological and adoptive children who lived in Russian and Romanian orphanages, researchers found that oxytocin rose in biological children after having contact with their mothers. The study, published in 2005 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that oxytocin levels remained static in the adoptive children in the same situation, suggesting a physiological basis for why some adoptive children have difficulty forming secure relationships.

 

Oxytocin eases stress

Research done on prairie voles showed that those separated from their siblings exhibited signs of anxiety, stress and depression that abated after they were injected with oxytocin. The study, presented at a 2007 meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, indicated the hormone’s effects were more evident under stressful situations.

 

Oxytocin crystallizes emotional memories

A November study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences supported researchers’ theory that oxytocin would amplify men’s early memories of their mothers. In a group of 31 men, those who inhaled a synthetic version of the hormone found the hormone intensified fond memories of their mothers if their relationships had been positive. Those whose ties with their mom’s had frayed downgraded their opinions after inhaling oxytocin, the study showed.

 

Oxytocin facilitates childbirth and breastfeeding

In its best understood role, oxytocin is released in large amounts during labor, intensifying the uterine contractions that open the cervix and allow the baby to pass through the birth canal. Physicians have been using synthetic oxytocin, also known by its brand name Pitocin, to induce or augment labor since the early 1900s. After birth, the hormone continues to stimulate uterine contractions that discourage hemorrhaging, and more is released when the nipples are stimulated during suckling, promoting the letdown of milk into the nipples.

 

Oxytocin boosts sexual arousal

Spontaneous erections in rats were observed after oxytocin was injected into their cerebrospinal fluid in a 2001 study in the journal Physiological Review. And a cocktail of brain chemicals that includes oxytocin is released in men during ejaculation. These chemicals can intensify bonding between sexual partners , though, Ellison noted, “it isn’t the same for everyone.”

“I think there is a variability,” said Ellison, who also teaches sexuality classes to health professionals. “For people who can really get into the sensualness of hugging and cuddling, that is the hormone released in this process. For people who don’t get into it, maybe they’re not releasing the oxytocin. It may be a circular thing.”

 

Oxytocin reduces drug cravings

According to a 1999 article in the journal Progress in Brain Research, some studies indicate that oxytocin inhibits tolerance to addictive drugs, including opiates, cocaine and alcohol , and reduces withdrawal symptoms. “It’s an antidote to craving,” Ellison explained. “That craving (for drugs), that hunger, is probably eased with this hormone. It’s involved with the satisfaction of hunger.”

 

Oxytocin improves social skills

A February study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showed that inhaling oxytocin significantly improved the ability of people with autism to interact with others. Previous studies indicated natural oxytocin levels were lower in those with autism, a developmental disorder characterized by difficulties in communication and social relationships. Oxytocin also reduced autistic individuals’ fear of others, researchers said.

 

Oxytocin triggers protective instincts

A June study in the journal Science suggested oxytocin triggers defensive aggression against outsiders who might threaten someone’s social group, such as in soldiers who defend their comrades. Prior animal studies had shown that the hormone promotes protectionist behavior, but this research was the first to demonstrate a similar effect in humans.

 

Oxytocin induces sleep

Oxytocin released in the brain under stress-free conditions naturally promotes sleep , according to a 2003 study in the journal Regulatory Peptides. Ellison said this link makes sense because oxytocin counters the effects of cortisol, which is the known as the stress hormone. “It has a calming effect,” she said. “It leaves you feeling tranquil and loving, and certainly that helps our path to sleep.”

Oxytocin fosters generosity

In a 2007 study in the journal Public Library of Science ONE, participants inhaled oxytocin or a placebo through their noses, and then were given a decision on how to split money with a stranger. Those on oxytocin were 80 percent more generous, researchers said, and the hormone seemed to affect their sense of altruism as well.

13 politically incorrect gun rules…

Gun lovers. Herewith are thirteen things to remember when carrying your weapon.  BTW- this list is not original.  I’ve Google up the bullet points but alas …I got nada in regards to who penned it. If and when someone schools me on who the author is you can rest assure that I’ll give him or her proper praise.  Enjoy.

 

1. Guns have only two enemies rust and politicians.

2. It’s always better to be judged by 12 than carried by 6.

3. Cops carry guns to protect themselves, not you.

4. Never let someone or something that threatens you get inside arms length.

5. Never say, “I’ve got a gun.” If you need to use deadly force, the first sound they hear should be the safety clicking off.

6. The average response time of a 911 call is 23 minutes; the response time of a .357 is 1400 feet per second.

7. The most important rule in a gunfight is: Always win – cheat if necessary.

8. Make your attacker advance through a wall of bullets . . . You may get killed with your own gun, but he’ll have to beat you to death with it, because it’ll be empty.

9. If you’re in a gunfight:

– If you’re not shooting, you should be loading.

– If you’re not loading, you should be moving.

– If you’re not moving, you’re dead.

10. In a life and death situation, do something . . . It may be wrong, but do something!

11. If you carry a gun, people may call you paranoid. Nonsense! If you have a gun, what do you have to be paranoid about?

12. You can say ‘stop’ or ‘alto’ or any other word, but a large bore muzzle pointed at someone’s head is pretty much a universal language.

13. You cannot save the planet, but you may be able to save yourself and your family.

 

Concise Survival Food Storage Guide

 

Survival food storage practice doesn’t require Mormon membership, but the tradition, wrought from their first Utah winter, is worth emulating should disaster strike or technology fail, two survival books by Mat Stein. A good  survival series, relies on Stein’s books, and websites dedicated to survival preparedness.

At its most basic, food storage wisdom demands that you buy what you eat, and organize and label the boxes or bins with contents and date. Stocks should be rotated based on shelf-life longevity. Using Stein’s general guide, when properly packaged and stored, various foods last several months, years or decades, as follows:

10 years or longer: Honey, sugar, salt, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, black pepper, Worcestershire sauce and wheat berries (WTF?).

5-10 years: Most dried legumes and whole grains, dehydrated cheese, instant or vacuum-packed coffee, baking powder, powdered eggs and frozen butter.

Up to 5 years: Processed (partially hydrogenated) liquid vegetable oils, Crisco shortening, cornmeal and corn flour, and nonfat powdered milk.

2-3 years: Bullion cubes, cornstarch, white rice, powdered gelatin, white wheat flour, white flour pasta, tapioca, textured vegetable protein, hydrogenated peanut butter, catsup, canned salmon and sardines, most dried fruits, and most other canned foods except meats, some fish and fruits, as well as sprouting seeds (alfalfa, mung, soybean, wheat, etc.).

Up to 18 months: Canned meats and seafood (halibut, mackerel, tuna and shrimp), unshelled raw nuts, dry active yeast, bagged snack chips, cake mixes, dry pudding, herbal and black teas, bottled juices, most seasonings and extracts, jams and jellies, canned non-citrus fruits (blackberries, blueberries, cherries, pears, peaches, plums, etc.), cranberry ssauce, pickles, canned rhubarb, and sauerkraut.

One year: Canned nuts, breakfast cereals, rolled oats, bottled dressings, mayonnaise, natural liquid vegetable oils, candy bars, bottled juices (grapefruit, pineapple, apricot, orange), canned citrus fruits and natural nut berries.

Six months: Most boxed food, fresh potatoes, granola, shelled raw nuts, and unshelled roasted nuts.

Studies by the Brigham Young University Dept. of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Science observes that proper packaging, storage methods and temperatures should yield the following storage capacities:

30 years or more: Whole grain wheat and white rice that has been packaged to remove oxygen and stored at room temperature or cooler.

Up to 30 years: beans, dried apples, macaroni, potato flakes and oats.

20-30 years: freeze-dried foods.

Up to 20 years: properly stored nonfat dried milk.

Baking powder will store for “many years” and baking soda will keep indefinitely. Most food stores longer under cool, dry and dark conditions.

Either of Stein’s books is worth owning for the section on root cellars and other cold storage (above- and below-ground), which is accompanied by detailed diagrams and tips, depending on the environment.

Of note, compromised cans should be avoided. Don’t waste money on dented cans, and never eat from cans that bulge, leak or spit at you when opened. Most US canaries use BPA, a “known endocrine disruptor that affects hormones and could be causing breast and prostate cancer, heart disease, brain retardation, impotence and infertility.” BPA-free cans are available.

Modern Survival Blog recommends clear, see-through bins to keep track of what you have, given that most folks need to see what the have to avoid over-buying one staple and not enough of others. They also recommend a variety of survival foods including bulk, ready-to-eat, dehydrated and freeze-dried foods.

Stein also provides a chart for using dry ice fumigation to protect against pests, and spends considerable time discussing the various packaging methods, most of which can be done in the home.

 

Dehydrated Food

A 14-pound bucket of Augason Farms dehydrated food costs $65, and provides over 2,000 calories a day for twelve days. Budget-wise, this is a much better deal than a box of MREs. The reusable plastic bucket with a water tight lid, and the 25-year shelf life, make this kit a superior choice if you’re not on the run, and you have measuring cups, pans, a stove and water.

Eight varieties of food are included, each in its own resealable pouch. Scissors not needed. However, not all the mylar bags were labeled, which only adds to the stress of having to eat emergency food. On the plus side, the federal food stamps program (now called SNAP) does cover the purchase.

While these foods are also preserved with chemicals and GMOs, Augason does not add hydrogenated oils, trans fats or MSG. The food is nitrogen flushed and packed with oxygen absorbers.

All the food is pretty tasty, and the brown sugar oatmeal was so delish that I added a fresh container of rolled oats to my diet. The cheesy broccoli rice dish only has wisps of broccoli, so I simply mixed it with the beef-flavored vegetarian meat substitute. Sounds gross, I know, but damn it tastes good, just like you’d expect a Whopper® to be deliciously deadly.

Organics and Seeds

Northbay Trading sells organic survivor food, but for many the cost is prohibitive. Mat Stein recommends storing and rotating sproutable seeds and provides a how-to section.

Most seeds will sprout in 2-5 days, but be aware that non-organic potatoes and tomato sprouts are poisonous, having been treated with fungicide. Stein recommends 20-50 pounds of sprouting seeds and supplies for a one-year supply for an adult male.

“Grains and legumes are probably the most compact and inexpensive type of food that can be stored for emergency preparedness,” he writes, noting that, “most nutritious in their raw form, sprouts can be sautéed, stir-fried, boiled or cooked into almost any dish,” providing “a source of garden-fresh veggies any time of the year.”

Ten Staples and Water

Activist Post recommends these ten foods available at your local grocer: rice, beans, cornmeal, lard, salt, white and brown sugar, and canned meat, fruit and veggies. Buy a healthy supply of each that you can rotate over time.

Survival food storage can’t be fully discussed without mentioning water. The bare minimum is a gallon a day per person, and double to triple that if you’re relying on dehydrated foods. Ure and Levy provide an in-depth discussion of water storage. Take note, though, that most plastic jugs in the US contain BPA (like canned foods), so be sure to buy BPA-free jugs.

Some preppers lay in food stocks that will cover them for a year or more and with today’s food technologies, this is entirely possible and easily doable. I’d also recommend not storing all your eggs in one basket; in other words, store your food and water in different places to avoid losing everything in one disaster that affects that room.

If you pussies in law enforcement really were working for the people you would arrest any and all DEA agents under the RICO act and for abuses under the color of law.  And whatever the hell else you can think up.

Oh and the SupremePundit does not use or believe that anyone should use the drug unless medically necessary.

 

But you FEDS and the NWO / Agenda 21 / Euro bankers that you are the bitches for need to be put in check.

It is called the sovereign rights of the state and of the people.

 

As legalization proponents celebrated the historic confrontation with the federal drug policy, the state began the yearlong job of setting up a marijuana market. Which means within a month, you can possess marijuana and use it in private, but there’s no place to legally buy it.Gov. Chris Gregoire, speaking on KUOW radio on Wednesday morning, said she hoped to work closely with the next governor on Initiative 502 before she leaves office in January.”The jury is out on what happens,” said Gregoire, referring to the federal response. “Meanwhile, my job as governor is to do what the people of the state of Washington have said they want done.”Bob Ferguson, the incoming state attorney general, said he could not predict the federal response. “I’m 100 percent looking forward to defending the will of the people and will defend it vigorously.”

via Pot legal Dec. 6, ‘jury is out on what happens’ after that | Local News | The Seattle Times.

Hey stop shaving that thing and just spray on some  prostaglandins known as PGD2 or its derivative, 15-dPGJ2, to inhibit hair growth.

Oh I am sorry I digress.   Now to the real info….

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified an abnormal amount a protein called Prostaglandin D2 in the bald scalp of men with male pattern baldness, a discovery that may lead directly to new treatments for the most common cause of hair loss in men. In both human and animal models, researchers found that a prostaglandin known as PGD2 and its derivative, 15-dPGJ2, inhibit hair growth. The PGD2-related inhibition occurred through a receptor called GPR44, which is a promising therapeutic target for androgenetic alopecia in both men and women with hair loss and thinning. The study is published in Science Translational Medicine.

Male pattern baldness strikes 8 of 10 men under 70 years old, and causes hair follicles to shrink and produce microscopic hairs, which grow for a shorter duration of time than normal follicles.

Researchers took an unbiased approach when scanning for potential biological causes of baldness, looking in scalp tissue from balding and non-bald spots from men with male pattern baldness and then corroborating findings in mouse models. They found that levels of PGD2 were elevated in bald scalp tissue at levels 3 times greater than what was found in comparative haired scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia. When PGD2 was added to cultured hair follicles, PGD2-treated hair was significantly shortened, while PGD2’s derivative, 15-dPGJ2, completely inhibited hair growth.

Science Translational Medicine – Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia

“The next step would be to screen for compounds that affect this receptor and to also find out whether blocking that receptor would reverse balding or just prevent balding – a question that would take a while to figure out.” The inhibition of hair growth is triggered when the protein binds to a receptor on the cells of hair follicles.

Several known drugs that target this pathway have already been identified, he added, including some that are in clinical trials.

Something applied to the scalp to prevent baldness and possibly help hair regrow seems possible.

Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness, known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme activity, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), is similarly elevated in bald scalp. During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD2 levels increase immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect on hair growth. We show that PGD2 inhibits hair growth in explanted human hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition requires the PGD2 receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)–coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD2 receptor 1 (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin, demonstrates elevated levels of PGD2 in the skin and develops alopecia, follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair growth in AGA and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment.

How Much for that Olympic Medal?

How Much is that Olympic Medal Worth? That all depends on your perspective: Meltdown Value Gold: $644 (92.5% silver with a bit of copper mixed in for strength, and gilded in approx. 6 grams of 24k gold) Silver: $330 (same composition as gold medal, without the gold) Bronze: Less than $5 (mostly copper, with a bit of zinc and tin- basically a giant penny) And what if that gold medal were actually made entirely of 24k gold? Then it would be worth about $22,000. (There have not been solid gold medals since the 1912 Stockholm Games.) Incentive Value As many as 204 National Olympic Committees provide financial incentives to athletes for each gold medal earned: Singapore (which has never won gold at the Olympics) is offering $800,000 per gold medal The United States: $25,000 Australia: $20,900 (with added incentive of being featured on an Australia stamp and getting a flight upgrade home) Russia: $135,000 Italy: $182,000 China: approx. $51,000 (although China has not officially released financial incentives details) India: promises coaching jobs to athletes who win medals British athletes, however, will have to settle for national glory and their image on a stamp rather than cash Marketing Value There are many factors involved in a company selecting an athlete endorser: sport (swimming, track and field, and gymnastics attract the most interest), multiple wins, name and face recognition, likeable personality, etc. Some gold medal athletes at London can expect over the four years to Rio 2016 to earn into the 7 figures from product endorsement deals. Speedo awarded Michael Phelps a $1 million bonus for breaking Mark Spitz’s 1972 record of seven gold medals in single Olympic events, and Usain Bolt received a $1.8 million bonus from his sponsor Digicel for breaking the 100 meter race world record. Resale Value The current world record price for an Olympic medal was achieved in November 2010 when a gold won by Mark Wells, a member of the 1980 “miracle on ice” U.S. men’s hockey team, was sold for $310,700. It was the first time any of the 1980 hockey gold medals were offered at a public auction. Humanitarian Value Ukrainian heavyweight boxer Wladimir Klitschko sold his medal from the 1996 Atlanta Games for $1 million in March this year with the funds going to the Klitschko Brothers Foundation which promotes sports among children. Immediately after the sale, the buyer returned the medal to Wladimir as a token of respect, because he wanted the medal to remain in the Klitschko family. Athletic Value Priceless.

Vit D3 and other health info

USA maps to help survive TEOTWAWKT

Mines in the USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

soil conductivity in USA and Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earthquake danger

Where is the wind and where are the electric lines

 

 

 

 

Man Tits exposed in public

Exposed man tits in public. So what the hell happened to equality?

TEXAS IS STILL A SEPARATE COUNTRY

ELECTRICAL GRIDS THAT ARE INTERCONNECTED (TEXAS IS ALONE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good for them!  every state should be able to secede and be independent within it’s borders.